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Types of Accommodations
Access to Adaptive Equipment

Facilitate access to the following adaptive equipment:

• Books on Kurzweil: Students will have access to a computer program where books are converted into digital files. Before each semester the student will provide book information to the Accessibility Center, which will then send to Bloomington for scanning. This process can take several weeks before the student has all books converted to digital.
• Personal Listening System: Coordinate with a student to use a personal listening system to amplify the voices of instructors and classmates. Personal listening systems reduce the impact of a disability by providing more direct access to lectures, presentations, and/or class discussions when issues related to effective hearing are encountered. Instructors and presenters may be asked to wear a microphone and transmitter unit or to locate a microphone and transmitter unit near a presentation source.
• Laptop in classroom for note taking and writing assignments: Coordinate with a student who uses a laptop in class for note taking and/or listening to written text. Some laptops are equipped with screen reading software that will vocalize files and other screen text to students. Some students with disabilities are unable to handwrite notes during lectures in a legible fashion or quickly enough to maintain focus. Using a laptop can decrease note taking errors and allow the student to keep pace with the lecturer. Laptops reduce the impact of a disability by providing an alternative mode of note taking, reading, or process of information due to visual, cognitive, or hearing impairments.
• Laptop use for essay test: Coordinate with a student who uses a laptop in class for typing their test. Laptops reduce the impact of a disability by providing an alternative mode of essay tests due to visual, cognitive, hearing, or physical impairments.

Alternate Testing Format: The student must have an alternative test for Scantron tests. This reduces stress and improves student’s concentration.
Arranged seating: Preferential seating reduces the impact of a disability by providing comfortable learning area due to physical challenges or more direct access to a lecture source and/or presentation materials when issues related to effective hearing or vision are encountered.

• Facilitate preferential seating toward the front of the room and away from noise sources.
• Facilitate preferential seating at the table/chair that physical plant has provided.


Every semester the student provides the Accessibility Center with their class schedule, who then coordinates with physical plant to provide appropriate seating to accommodate their disability.

Extended Time for In-Class Assignments
Provide extra time to complete in-class assignments. Extended time will reduce the impact of the disability by allowing students additional time for symbol recognition and decoding, cognitive processing, and/or to reduce the stress of the testing environment.
Extended and/or Unlimited Time for Testing

Student will be provided either extend or unlimited time based on need. 

Provide extended time at 150% (time and one-half) the normal testing allowance. Extended time is designed to reduce the impact of the disability by allowing students additional time for symbol recognition and decoding, cognitive processing, and/or to reduce the stress of the testing environment. Extended testing can be provided in the classroom, but if the testing center is preferred, then arrangements can be made by contacting their office.

Unlimited time is designed to reduce the impact of the disability by allowing students additional time for symbol recognition and decoding, cognitive processing, and/or to reduce the stress of the testing environment. Extended testing can be provided in the classroom, but if the testing center is preferred, then arrangements can be made by contacting their office.
Use of Calculator for test: Allow the use of a calculator for tests that involve mathematical calculations, unless it goes beyond the learning objectives of the class. The use of a calculator reduces the impact of a disability by providing an instrument that assists in digit sequencing, sequencing of mathematical steps, or converting mathematical symbols into operational functions.

Materials in Alternative Format
Provide overheads, PowerPoint slides, and other visual aids, or electronic access to the same, if available, in advance. Copied materials or materials in alternate text reduces the impact of a disability by providing access to written material for individuals with visual, physical, or cognitive processing difficulties.
Medical

Reach an agreement with the student regarding absences from class that are related to a medical condition. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor to discuss the need for absences and the impact of the absences on course objectives and activities.

The student understands that:

1. Excessive absences may impact the instructional integrity and educational objectives of a course, and
2. The instructor determines course attendance policy and makes decisions regarding satisfactory academic progress. Reach an agreement with the student regarding the need to miss a quiz or exam due to a medical condition. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor to discuss alternative arrangements.

The student understands that:

1. A plan should be agreed upon in advance, and
2. The instructor determines course policy regarding quizzes and exams and makes decisions regarding exceptions to this policy.

Allowance for absences reduces the impact of a disability by providing flexibility when making appointments for medical emergencies, testing or health maintenance.

Mentor/Tutor
Student is advised to utilize tutors/mentors as much as possible to be successful.
Note Taker

Assist student in identifying a notetaker. The student is responsible for identifying a student who is enrolled in the same class; this student will provide a copy of their notes. Notetakers should contact the Accessibility Center to receive pay.

Note takers are provided to reduce the impact of a disability by providing support in the symbol recognition and decoding process, to eliminate or decrease the latency in short-term cognitive processing, to eliminate or decrease the physical fatigue of extended on-task activities, or to supplement a student’s notes when hearing, visual, or distraction impairments exist.

Routine Check in Meetings (Mtg)
Student meets with a coordinator on a regular basis to survey obstacles, successes, and motivation.
Scribe/Reader

Coordinate with the student and testing center to arrange a test date and time at least 48 hours prior to the testing date (If that is where the scribe will meet the student to take the test). Instructor must hand deliver the test to testing center at least 2 hours prior to testing.

The student is responsible for contacting the Accessibility Center, at least two weeks prior to test, to have scribe/reader arranged. Best practice is to provide copies of syllabi at the beginning of each semester with highlighted dates, times, and places for testing.

Scribes/reader help to reduce the impact of a disability by providing alternative forms of information assimilation and expression. Scribes augment the symbol encoding skills of students with visual, cognitive, and physical impairments, or help to eliminate or decrease the physical fatigue of extended on-task activities. When used during testing, scribes/reader are not allowed to interpret, add to, or subtract from the material being tested. They read and/or write verbatim what is presented to them.

Service Animals

IU Kokomo does not have a formal policy regarding service animals. Service animals, as defined below, are permitted on campus and in all areas of campus facilities where the public is normally allowed to go. However, the campus expects that the animal will be under control and on a leash at all times1. Furthermore, it is expected that the owner will be responsible for cleaning up after the animal, as well as for feeding and providing water for the animal. Such animals shall not be left in closed vehicles unattended on campus. If any student has medical concerns relating to the presence of a service animal in the classroom, he/she should contact the Accessibility Center immediately so that the concerns can be appropriately addressed.

ADA Definition of a Service Animal:

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.


1 Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In that case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls.
Taping of Lectures
Allow the student to tape record all lectures; unless it goes beyond the learning objectives of the class. The instructor should reach an agreement with the student regarding confidentiality and when taping is not appropriate. Unless permission is otherwise granted by an instructor, the taped material is to be viewed only by the student with a disability. If there are concerns of confidentiality or intellectual property, contact the Accessibility Center. The instructor may request that a taping device be turned off if it violates the confidentiality rights of others. Taping of lectures reduces the impact of a disability by providing a mechanism to review verbally presented material when short-term memory, cognitive processing, or visual impairments exist.
Technological Accommodations

Assistive technology offers many students with disabilities the ability to meet their full potential within their educational program. The consideration and provision of AT for students with disabilities is a support service offered by the university.

• Kurzweil 3000 is a program that enables conversion of print to electronic text which can be read to the user. The program also offers a variety of study skills tools to make learning easy.
• Zoom Text is a program that magnifies the computer screen for visually impaired users. This program also has the ability to speak to the user as he/she works.
• Inspiration enables users to conceptually organize thoughts and ideas using graphic organizers for representation. These representations can be used for later outlining and studying purposes.

Testing in Quiet Area
Arrange to have all tests taken in the testing center or in a quiet area. This service is designed to reduce distractions, and improve the student’s concentration. Distraction reduced testing is provided to reduce the impact of a disability on a testing event by reducing extraneous triggers that cue a person to divert their attention from a task or that induce a stress reaction. Common triggers are sound (including humming and high-pitched sounds, such as a computer or television set, shuffling of paperwork, etc.), extraneous light (including flashes from windows and blinking overhead lighting), and misc. activity (including peer movement within the room, instructor pacing, motion in the hallway, etc.).
Last updated: 02/02/2016