Skip to main content
Skip to main navigation
Skip to search

Undergraduate Courses

All Undergraduate Course Descriptions

  • AFRO-A 150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans (3 cr.) The culture of blacks in America viewed from a broad interdisciplinary approach, employing resources from history, literature, folklore, religion, sociology, and political science.
  • AFRO-A 210 The Black Woman in America (3 cr.) A historical overview of the black woman's role in American society, including family, social, and political relationships.
  • AHLT-A 344 Strength Training and Conditioning (3 cr.) This course is intended to cover the essentials of strength training and conditioning to prepare a student who is interested in becoming a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist or a Certified Personal Trainer. (P: ANAT-A 215, PHYS-P 215)
  • AHLT-A 491 Internship in Health Sciences (1-6 cr.) Under the guidance of a Health Science faculty the student will perform an internship that is suitable to meet the learning objectives of the course. Objectives may vary depending on the specific concentration and internship facility.  This is a variable credit course. (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-B 371 Human Resource Management in Health Care (3 cr.) Human resource management in the health care system.  Including planning, staffing, development, performance appraisal, job design development and analysis 
  • AHLT-B 352 Performance Improvement in Health Management (3 cr.) This course provides the fundamental concepts of quality management in health care systems and the essential tools, to measure and analyze a system, evaluate problems, and implement necessary changes to improve system performance. You will study system model theory in health care and utilize critical thinking to create changes in your own organization to improve client care, patient safety and essential services. Therefore, you will be utilizing your personal experience in assignments, to create a more meaningful student experience, useful in your future endeavours.  (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-B 371 Human Resource Management in Health Care (3 cr.) Human resource management in the health care system.  Including planning, staffing, development, performance appraisal, job design development and analysis 
  • AHLT-B 499 Health Management Capstone (1-3 cr.) The main purpose this course is to provide the culminating, integrative curricular experience for students in the Bachelor of Applied Science degree Health Management Track. Students will also assess the impact of their educational experiences on their ethical perspectives and critical thinking skills. (Senior in BAS graduating within calendar)
  • AHLT-C 180 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory (1 cr.) This course is an accelerated 8 week course. An overview and introduction to laboratory safety and basic skills as used in specimen processing and laboratory information systems, urinalysis, hematology, chemistry, immunology, immunohematology, and microbiology and phlebotomy. Universal precautions and proper procedures in regard to specimen processing will be taught to the student. Laboratory quality control, and the proper use of instrumentation will be presented as used in the clinical laboratory settings.  Normal human laboratory values will be discussed.  Students will take field trips to local health facilities’ laboratories. Attendance for these trips is mandatory for success in this course.
  • AHLT-C 340 Principles of Sports Officiating (1 cr.) Topics in sports officiating will include sports such as football, basketball, softball (baseball) and volleyball. Ethics of sport officiating; mastery, interpretation, and application of sports rules. Laboratory and classroom experiences.
  • AHLT-C 350 Theory and Technique of Coaching Basketball (2 cr.) This course will provide students an understanding and knowledge of the theory, principals, philosophy, techniques, and strategies of basketball at elementary, secondary, and collegiate levels.
  • AHLT-C 354 Theory and Technique of Coaching of Volleyball (2 cr.) This course will provide students an understanding and knowledge of the theory, principals, philosophy, techniques, and strategies of volleyball at elementary, secondary, and collegiate levels.
  • AHLT-C 360 Philosophical Foundations of Coaching (3 cr.) A philosophical approach to coaching for various sports. Topics include, but are not limited to, different coaching styles and strategies, growth and development characteristics, legal issues and liability, pedagogical considerations, coaching relationships, and other issues and problems related to sport.
  • AHLT-C 485 Practicum in Coaching (1-6 cr.) Under the advisement of a faculty member and supervision of a coach/ sports/ fitness specialist, the student will work or otherwise actively participate in a coaching setting.   (Junior/Senior standing and admission to the Coaching Minor) CPR Certification must be completed and recorded.
  • AHLT-F 144 Foundations of Human Movement (3 cr.) Identification, analysis, and evaluation of fundamental motor patterns, progressions in skill development and skills for effective teaching. Analysis, evaluation and development of personal movement and sports skills.
  • AHLT-H 415 Child and Adolescent Health (3 cr.) An overview of determinants and indicators of health of children and adolescents.  
  • AHLT-H 271 Grant Writing for Health Professionals (3 cr.) Developing effective grant writing skills are essential to acquire competitive funding from government agencies and private foundations.  (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 305 Food and Beverage Operations (3 cr.) Explores the management of food and beverage operations.  Topics include menu selection, service styles, delivery outlet, safety and guest/ client relations. 
  • AHLT-H 322 Epidemiology and Biostatistics (3 cr.) This course introduces the basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics as applied to public health. Epidemiology is known as the principal science of public health, and is the study of the distribution and determinants of health conditions or events among populations. Emphasis is placed on the methods of epidemiological investigation, appropriate summaries and displays of data and the use of statistical approaches to describe the health of populations.  (P. MATH-M 118, 119, OR 125)
  • AHLT-H 325 Foundations of Health Education (3 cr.) The focus of this course is the study of the practice of health education in various settings, and selected historical, cultural, philosophical, professional, and ethical issues in the practice of education.  Topics addressed in the course include historical perspectives, practice settings, career opportunities, professional ethics, trends, and current issues. Emphasis will also be placed on topics related to the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC).  (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 327 Introduction to Community Health (3 cr.) A foundational overview of the field of Community Health to include policy and functions of governmental health organizations, prevention of disease and injuries in the general population, the basic health sciences (epidemiology, behavior / social sciences and environmental health) and future directions of  community health. (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 331 Environmental Health (3 cr.) This course explores the relationship between humans and their environment; how it affects their physical well-being, and what they can do to protect and enhance their health and influence the quality of the environment. (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 364 Stress Management in the Health Professions (3 cr.) This course examines the biology of stress and the psychological aspects of stress and its relationship to physiological/ psychological illnesses.  Practical and effective stress management options such as coping strategies, time management, behavior modification, and relaxation techniques are explored. (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 383 Consumer Health (3 cr.) This course is an overview or survey course of health products and services.  The health system is large and complex.  Therefore, the consumer needs to exercise proper discretion in selecting and properly utilizing the myriad of medical goods and services based upon personal values and decision-making skills. This course will also explore consumer issues related to proper selection of food and nutritional productions comparing different food labeling and costs.  Chronic Diseases in America are discussed from a consumer health approach.  (Cross-list with HPER – H 315); (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 400 Topics in Health Sciences (3 cr.) Variable content course. This course is intended to allow the student to explore a number of topics that are typically associated with personal and community health.  These will include, but not limited to Health Behaviors, Chronic Diseases and conditions such as Cancer, Diabetes and Obesity;  Environmental factors that influence health around the world including America; supports groups and Recreational Therapies; Age related health topics; May be repeated once for credit.  (P. 30 + credit hours or permission of instructor)
  • AHLT-H 411 Promoting Health Behaviors (3 cr.) Concepts, theories and applied approaches for health communications with emphasis on social marketing, media, advocacy and the process of media messages on health behaviors. (P- S121 Speech, and AHLT-H 327 Intro to Public Health or instructor permission) (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 415 Child and Adolescent Health (3 cr.) An overview of determinants and indicators of health of children and adolescents.  (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 434 Diseases of Diverse Population (3 cr.) This course covers current information about infectious and chronic diseases from a community health perspective; including physiological, psychological, social, cultural, political, environmental, healthcare and economic aspects influencing disease of diverse populations of the world. (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • AHLT-H 492 Independent Research Studies in Health Sciences (1-6 cr.) Students taking the independent research study will immerse themselves in a new or ongoing research project conducted by Allied Health Science faculty.  In this context, students will be given opportunities to learn practical, hands-on research skills.  These skills could include, but are not limited to ethics submissions, data collection, data analysis, scientific writing and scientific presentations.  For this course the formal class setting will not be used. Instead, students will meet individually or in small groups with the course instructor.  These meetings will generally occur on a weekly basis, as agreed upon by the instructor and student. This will all for the course work to center on the needs of the student and the assigned project.  Repeatable for credit. (P. Instructor consent)
  • AHLT-H 499 Senior Health Sciences Capstone (3 cr.) Demonstration of competencies and skills acquired throughout the health sciences education program. To include a professional portfolio.  P. Graduating in Health Sciences in the calendar year; and four of the following five courses: (AHLT-H 325, AHLT-H 327, AHLT-H 411, AHLT-H 415 and AHLT-H 434)
  • AHLT-M 366 Leadership for Health Professionals (3 cr.) This course addresses the Leadership of organizations that deliver health care services such as hospitals, nursing homes, multi-specialty clinics, and home health care agencies.  Students will examine principles of effective management including organizational design, motivation, leadership, conflict management, teamwork, and strategic alliances.
  • AHLT-M 195 Medical Terminology (3 cr.) This course presents a study of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols are included in the content. A programmed leaning, word building systems approach will be used to learn word parts that are used to construct or analyze new terms. This provides the opportunity to decipher unfamiliar terms and check their spelling. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition, usage and pronunciation. Abbreviations will be introduced as related terms. This course is now an online offering.
  • AHLT-M 366 Leadership for Health Professionals (3 cr.) This course addresses the leadership of organizations that deliver health care services such as hospitals, nursing homes, multi-specialty clinics, and home health care agencies.  Students will examine principles of effective management including organizational design, motivation, leadership, conflict management, teamwork, and strategic alliances.  (P. 30 + credit hours).
  • AHLT-M 101 Introduction to Health Records (3 cr.) Focus on the role of the coding professionals as an essential part of the healthcare team.
  • AHLT-M 190 Coding I (3 cr.) The study of ICD-9-CM coding and classification principles and CPT coding principles, as used in acute ambulatory and long-term care facilities.
  • AHLT-M 191 Coding II (3 cr.) Advanced principles of the ICD-9-CM classification system; optimization; DRG's, sequencing, reimbursement; application of CPT coding principles in acute and ambulatory settings.
  • AHLT-M 192 Introduction to HIM and Reimbursement Methodologies (3 cr.) Introduction to health information management, health records, standards, regulations and content; overview of release of information principles, privacy and security; reimbursement methodologies including Medicare, third party payers, ambulatory settings and physician practices.
  • AHLT-M 285 Internship in Medical Coding (1-6 cr.) Clinical assessment in systems and processes for collecting, maintaining, and disseminating health related information; development of professional attitude for interacting with consumers and other professions in the health care industry.  (P. all courses for coding certificate must be completed prior to this internship)
  • AHLT-M 301 Electronic Medical Records Management (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce the student to the basics of electronic medical records (EMR) management. This course outlines the essential documents/data content required for maintaining legal medical records using electronic and paper media.
  • AHLT-N 130 Introduction to Foods (3 cr.) This course examines the relationship between nourishment, lifestyle choices, and health and disease.  Topics include sources and functions of nutrients and their metabolism.  Investigation of eating patterns using database technology demonstrates the relationship between food consumption and nutrient adequacy.  The economic, cultural and psychological implications of food choices and eating behaviors are studies.
  • AHLT-N 271 Cultural Gustatory Perceptions (3 cr.) Gustatory, medically, refers to the sense of taste.  The sense of taste helps identify food and forms a taste preference, although the appeal of both sweet- and salty-tasting substances, in large part at least, is innately determined (Beauchamp and Cowart, 1985).  Gustatory behaviors, such as neophobia and taste aversion learning, suggest that the gustatory information from the taste buds is compared to gustatory memories at all times during food intake, and thus we avoid ingesting novel or harmful food. Gustatory memories enable us to generate vivid perceptions of taste in the absence of peripheral gustatory inputs. Thus, not only signals from the peripheral gustatory nervous system but also those obtained by recalling gustatory memories play a critical role for gustatory information processing. Designed on one hand to examine food preferences, delicacies and taboos tied to some of the world's most unusual sources of sustenance, the course is  also crafted to connect the simple acts of eating, no matter how unusual the product or preparation, with the supper table's intricate links to culture, identity, politics and economics. This course seeks to explore ways people are working to preserve their food cultures.   In doing so, students also receive education through concepts and basic nutrition knowledge. 
  • AHLT-N 323 Topics in Nutritional Science (3 cr.) Variable topics in nutritional sciences related to current issues in the field of nutrition/ dietetics.  Possible topics for weight reduction and fad diets, food additives, diet and human performance, vegans and vegetarianism, child nutrition, diet for senior citizens and disease relations. (P. HPER-N 220 or AHLT-N 336) 
  • AHLT-N 336 Nutrition Through the Lifecycle (3 cr.) Application of nutrition principles to the human life cycle: nutrient functions, needs from infants to mature aging.
  • AHLT-N 378 Global Nutrition (3 cr.) The history of food and hunger, and the global nature of our food systems focusing on the impact of our food decisions on the environment, agricultural production, world population relative to food supply, hunger, biotechnology, and safety of our food supply. No prerequisites to this course. Also discuss community nutrition and resources for under-served populations such as meals-on-wheel and WICS.
  • AHLT-N 442 Exercise and Nutrition (3 cr.) Nutritional needs of individuals participating in physical activity and sport. Topics include the role of individual nutrients in metabolism, estimation of energy needs, fluid balance, food fads, meal planning and nutritional needs of the body during various stages of activity.  (P. HPER-N 220 and Statistic course)
  • AHLT-R 100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology (2 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 101, AHLT-R 102, and AHLT-R 181. Introduction to the field of radiology and its history. Students learned proper ethical standards, become acquainted with the duties and responsibilities in personal care for the patient, and investigate radiation protection for the patient and personnel.
  • AHLT-R 101 Radiologic Procedures 1 (4 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 100, AHLT-R 102, and AHLT-R 181. Concepts in radiography with emphasis on the radiographic procedures used to demonstrate the skeletal system.*
  • AHLT-R 102 Principles of Radiography I (3 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 101, AHLT-R 181. Basic concepts of radiation, its production, and its interactions with matter. Includes the production of the radiographic image and film processing.
  • AHLT-R 181 Clinical Experience in Radiography I (4 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 100. Clinical application of radiographic positioning, exposure techniques, and departmental procedures in all phases of radiologic technology, under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until mastery of clinical objectives is reached.*
  • AHLT-R 182 Clinical Experience in Radiography II (4 cr.) Clinical application of radiographic positioning, exposure techniques, and departmental procedures in all phases of radiologic technology, under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until mastery of clinical objectives is reached.
  • AHLT-R 200 Pathology (2 cr.) A survey of the changes that occur in the diseased state to include general concepts of disease, causes of disease, clinical symptoms and treatment, and diseases that affect specific body systems.
  • AHLT-R 201 Radiographic Procedures II (4 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 101, and AHLT-R 182. Concepts in radiography with emphasis on radiographic procedures used to demonstrate the skull and those requiring the use of contrast media.*
  • AHLT-R 202 Principles of Radiography II (3 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 102, R 201, and R 181. Continuation of R 102 with emphasis on the properties that affect the quality of the radiographic image.
  • AHLT-R 205 Radiographic Procedures III (4 cr.) C or P: AHLT-R 201 and AHLT-R 222. Concepts in radiography with emphasis on special radiographic procedures and related imaging modalities.*
  • AHLT-R 207 Current Topics in Radiography (2 cr.) Individual and group study focusing on the state of the art in radiography.
  • AHLT-R 208 Topics in Radiography (2 cr.) Selected topics in radiography. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • AHLT-R 222 Principles of Radiography III (3 cr.) Continuation of AHLT-R 202 with emphasis on the application of radiography principles on imaging equipment.
  • AHLT-R 250 Physics Applied to Radiology (3 cr.) Fundamentals of radiation physics, X-ray generation, and equipment quality control.
  • AHLT-R 260 Radiation Biology and Protection in Diagnostic Radiology (3 cr.) Study of the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the standards and methods of protection. Emphasis is placed on X-ray interactions. Also included are discussions on radiation exposure standards and radiation monitoring.
  • AHLT-R 281 Clinical Experience in Radiography III (5 cr.) Clinical application of radiographic positioning, exposure techniques, and departmental procedures in all phases of radiologic technology, under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until mastery of clinical objectives is reached.
  • AHLT-R 282 Clinical Experience in Radiography IV (5 cr.) Clinical application of radiographic positioning, exposure techniques, and departmental procedures in all phases of radiologic technology, under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until mastery of clinical objectives is reached.
  • AHLT-R 283 Clinical Experience in Radiography V (3 cr.) Clinical application of radiography positioning, exposure techniques, and departmental procedures in all phases of radiologic technology, under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until mastery of clinical objectives is reached.
  • AHLT-R 290 Comprehensive Experience (5 cr.) Clinical application of radiographic positioning, exposure techniques, and departmental procedures in all phases of radiologic technology under the direct supervision of a registered technologist. Successful completion involves mastery of all clinical aspects of the program.
  • AHLT-R 404 Sectional Imaging Anatomy (3 cr.) An in-depth study of sectional anatomy pertinent to ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Standard transverse, parasagittal, and coronal planes are included, utilizing images from all three imaging modalities. A discussion of technique, artifacts, and pathology-related alterations of cross-sectional anatomic appearances is included.
  • AHLT-R 405 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging I (3 cr.) Physics and imaging concepts in cardiovascular interventional technology, computed tomography, diagnostic medical sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging.
  • AHLT-R 406 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging II (3 cr.) Procedural concepts in cardiovascular interventional technology, computed tomography, diagnostic medical sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Image analysis of normal and abnormal studies will be presented.
  • AHLT-R 407 Seminar: Advanced Medical Imaging Technology (3 cr.) Seminar in advanced imaging modalities. Topics will vary.
  • AHLT-R 408 Topics in Radiologic Sciences (3 cr.) Study of selected topics in radiologic sciences. May be repeated once for credit if topics differ.
  • AHLT-R 409 Senior Project in Medical Imaging Technology (3 cr.) Independent readings and research on a selected medical imaging topic written in a professional research format.
  • AHLT-R 481 Clinical Practicum: Vascular Imaging (8-12 cr.) Clinical experience in the performance of vascular and neurological imaging studies.*
  • AHLT-R 482 Clinical Practicum: Computed Tomography (8-12 cr.) Clinical experience in the performance of computed tomographic imaging studies.*
  • AHLT-R 483 Clinical Practicum: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (8-12 cr.) Clinical experience in the performance of magnetic resonance imaging studies.*
  • AHLT-R 484 Clinical Practicum: Ultrasound Imaging (8-12 cr.) Clinical experience in the performance of ultrasound imaging studies.*
  • AHLT-R 485 Clinical Practicum (6 cr.) Clinical experience in various radiological modalities –Variable topics.*
  • AHLT-R 490 Independent Study in Medical Imaging Technology (1-6 cr.) Prerequisite currently enrolled in MIT major or instructor consent.  This course is designed to offer medical imaging technology students the ability to complete various topics of study related to this field but that are not covered in other MIT courses.  Topics will vary according to the student’s desired direction of study.
  • AHLT-S 214 Introduction to Health Sciences (3 cr.) This course is designed for students to explore a wide array of subject areas in the field of health sciences. This course will focus on the Health, Exercise, Fitness and Sports. Topics will include sport psychology, exercise psychology, motor behavior, and health and wellness.
  • AHLT-S 280 Principles of Athletic Training (3 cr.) This course will provide the student an introduction to athletic training which will include history, injury prevention establishing a program for injury prevention and rehabilitation. Emphasis will be on preventing injuries and recognition. (P. ANAT- A 215 or consent of instructor)
  • AHLT-S 455 Topics in Sports and Fitness (3 cr.) The aim of this course is to explore the social psychological research and theories that facilitate understanding of personal excellence in sport.  The course introduces theoretical and empirical work on participation and acquisition of expertise in sport as well as methodological issues related to developmental research in sport.  Specific discussion will focus on developmental aspects and learning conditions that allow individuals to maintain participation and reach high levels of performance in sport.
  • AHLT-S 491 Sports and Fitness Internship (1-6 cr.) Under the advisement of a faculty member and supervision of a coach/sports/fitness specialist, the student will work or otherwise actively participate in a sports and fitness setting. May be repeated for credit.
  • AHLT-W 314 Ethical Practices for Allied Health Professionals (3 cr.) Ethics for Health Professionals provides a thorough grounding in ethical theories and principles as reflected in current health care issues and policies. Students are introduced to a variety of frameworks for ethical decision-making and policy analysis. Current trends in the political, economic, and legal spheres of the contemporary health care arena are analyzed through the use of case studies, articles and video presentations. 
  • AHLT-W 100 Careers in the Health Professions (3 cr.) This course explores many of the primary Allied Health Science professions found in health care.
  • AHLT-W 120 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness (3 cr.) Designed to provide students the knowledge and opportunity to develop and participate in a fitness program to include the four health-related physical fitness components: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength & endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
  • AHLT-W 165 First Aid and Emergencies (3 cr.) Covers the necessary First Aid and knowledge about emergencies to proper care for someone who experiences injury or sudden illness.
  • AHLT-W 210 Current Issues in Health Care (3 cr.) This course is designed to expose students to a variety of issues relevant to healthcare and promotions of healthy lifestyles.  This course is aimed at examining current issues that affect health of individuals, USA population and globally.
  • AHLT-W 301 Intergraded and Complimentary Health (3 cr.) This course focuses on the pathophysiology and holistic health management of acute and chronic problems.
  • AHLT-W 310 Women’s Health (3 cr.) Examines the relationship of women to health and health care. Five dimensions of health – physical, mental, emotional social and spiritual- provide a framework for comparison and contrast of health concerns unique to women and common to both sexes of all ages. (P 30 + hours of credits)
  • AHLT-W 314 Ethics for Health Professionals (3 cr.) Ethics for Health Professionals provides a thorough grounding in ethical theories and principles as reflected in current health care issues and policies.  Students are introduced to a variety of frameworks for ethical decision-making and policy analysis.  Current trends in the political, economic, and legal spheres of the contemporary health care arena are analyzed through the use of case studies, articles and video presentations. (P 30 + hours of credits)
  • ANAT-A 215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) Fall, Spring. Structure of cells, tissues, organs, and systems and their relationship to function.*
  • ANTH-A 103 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.) Humans, their biological evolution, and their archaeological history through stone and metal ages.
  • ANTH-A 104 Culture and Society (3 cr.) Every semester. Introduction to the comparative study of contemporary human cultures and social processes that influence behavior.
  • ANTH-E 329 Indians in the U.S. in the Twentieth (3 cr.) Position of the American Indian as an ethnic minority, including health, education, economy, and political consideration of proposals to change the Indian’s status.
  • ANTH-E 445 Medical Anthropology (3 cr.) A cross-cultural examination of human biocultural adaptation in health and disease, including biocultural epidemiology; ethnomedical systems in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease; and sociocultural change and health.
  • ANTH-E 455 Anthropology of Religion (3 cr.) Critical evaluation of current approaches to the analysis of religious myth, ritual, and symbolism. Problems in understanding religious beliefs of other cultures. Modern development of the anthropology of religion.
  • ANTH-P 360 Prehistory of North America (3 cr.) Introduction to antiquity of the American Indian, principal culture areas, and field methods and techniques incident to recovery of archaeological data and materials.
  • AST-A 100 The Solar System (3 cr.) Celestial sphere and constellations, measurement of time, astronomical instruments, earth as a planet, the moon, eclipses, planets and their satellites, comets, meteors, theories of origin of solar system.
  • AST-A 110 Introduction to Astronomy (3 cr.) Spring. This course presents a survey of modern astronomy including planetary science, stellar and galactic astrophysics and cosmology.
  • BIOL-L 100 Humans and the Biological World (5 cr.) Fall, Spring. Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organisms, with special reference given to humans. Credit given for only one 100-level biology course. For non-majors.*
  • BIOL-L 105 Introduction to Biology (5 cr.) Fall, Spring. Integrated picture of manner in which organisms at diverse levels of organization meet most problems in maintaining and propagating life. Credit given for only one 100-level biology course.*  
  • BIOL-L 203 Evolution and Diversity of Life (3 cr.) To provide an understanding and overview over the concept of evolution and how it shaped the diversity of life.
  • BIOL-L 211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) Spring. Introduction to molecular biology, including mechanisms and regulation of gene expression as well as mechanisms of mutation, repair, and recombination of DNA.
  • BIOL-L 213 Molecular Biology Laboratory (2 cr.) Spring. Accompanying laboratory for BIOL-L 211. Introduction to basic techniques in molecular biology.
  • BIOL-L 270 Humans and Microorganisms (3 cr.) Beneficial and harmful activities of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses. Production of fermented foods, food poisoning and foodborne infections. Introduction to epidemiology, microbial diseases, antibiotics and immunization. Water and wastewater microbiology and waterborne infections.
  • BIOL-L 321 Principles of Immunology (3 cr.) An introduction to the basic principles of immunology and its applications. Topics covered include the inflammatory response, complement, cell-mediated and humoral immunity, cell interactions, genetics of the immune response, immunization and immunological methods.
  • BIOL-L 329 Biochemistry I: Proteins and Enzymes (3-5 cr.) This course focuses on protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms.  Topics in bioinformatics are covered.  The laboratory studies methods to isolate, purify, and identify enzymes and proteins.  Determination of enzyme kinetics.
  • BIOL-L 336 Evolutionary Medicine (3 cr.) An introduction and overview of the evolutionary perspectives of health and disease, with emphasis on human diseases.
  • BIOL-L 345 Vertebrate Biology (3 cr.) Alternate years.  A general overview of the biology of vertebrate animals including aspects of their evolutionary history, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology, behavior and natural history. 
  • BIOL-L 350 Environmental Biology (3 cr.) Not open to biology majors. Interactions of human beings with other elements of the biosphere with emphasis on population, community, and ecosystem levels of ecology.  
  • BIOL-L 364 Principles of Genetics (3 cr.) Analysis of genetic mechanisms and processes, recombination, genetic interaction, gene regulation, biotechnological applications, genomics, cancer genetics and evolution.
  • BIOL-L 367 Cell Physiology (3 cr.) Alternate years.  Introduction to biochemical structure and metabolic activities of plant, animal, and microbial cells; physiology of membranes; locomotion and response; growth, division, and differentiation of cells.
  • BIOL-L 377 Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles (3 cr.) An extensive study of amphibians and reptiles including behavior, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Course will include a survey of world diversity, comparative dissections, field exercises, behavioral experiments, and review of the primary literature. 
  • BIOL-L 379 Principles of Ornithology (3 cr.) Summer  This course will cover bird evolution, taxonomy, biology, ecology and behavior with emphasis on Indiana birds.  
  • BIOL-L 391 Special Topics in Biology (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected biological issues and problems. Topics vary from semester to semester. 
  • BIOL-L 403 Biology Seminar (3 cr.) Alternate years.  A seminar course concerned with current topics and issues in the biological sciences. 
  • BIOL-L 473 Ecology (3 cr.) Alternate years.  Major concepts of ecology for science majors; relation of individual organisms to their environment, population ecology, and structure and function of ecosystems.  
  • BIOL-L 474 Laboratory in Ecology (2 cr.) Introduction to research problems and techniques in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems.
  • BIOL-L 490 Individual Study (1-12 cr.) Arr. Must complete a written assignment as evidence of each semester’s work. Must present oral report to complete more than 6 credit hours. 
  • BIOL-L 498 Internship in Professional Practice (1-6 cr.) Designed to provide opportunities for students to receive credit for career-related, full-time work. Evaluation by employer and faculty supervisor. Course credit may count as elective hours in the Biology B.A./B.S. and Biological and Physical Sciences B.A./B.S. degree requirements.
  • BUS-A 200 Foundations of Accounting (3 cr.) Survey of financial and managerial accounting topics that provide a foundation for students who are not pursuing a business concentration. No credit toward a B.S. in Business. Credit not given for both BUS-A 200 and BUS-A 201.
  • BUS-A 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 cr.) Concepts and issues of financial reporting for business entities; analysis and recording of economic transactions.
  • BUS-A 202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 cr.) Concepts and issues of management accounting; budgeting; cost determination and analysis.
  • BUS-A 311 Intermediate Accounting (3 cr.) Theory of asset valuation and income measurement. Principles underlying published financial statements including consideration of enterprise assets and liabilities.
  • BUS-A 312 Intermediate Accounting (3 cr.) Application of intermediate accounting theory to problems of accounting for economic activities, including long-term liabilities, corporations, earnings per share, tax allocation, pensions, and leases. Also covered are the statement of changes in financial position, and inflation accounting.
  • BUS-A 325 Cost Accounting (3 cr.) Conceptual and technical aspects of management and cost accounting. Product costing; cost control over projects and products; profit planning.
  • BUS-A 328 Introduction to Taxation (3 cr.) Internal Revenue Code and regulations. Emphasis on the philosophy of taxation, including concepts, exclusions from income, deductions, and credits.
  • BUS-A 337 Accounting Information Systems (3 cr.) The course's primary objective is to build upon, extend, and facilitate the integration of business and technical knowledge to help students succeed as managers in a technology-intensive, corporate environment. Through the use of readings, lectures, cases, and exercises the course enables students to understand and manage information technology in order to achieve competitive advantage through improved decision making, business processes, operations, and organizational controls.
  • BUS-A 339 Advanced Income Tax (3 cr.) Internal Revenue Code and regulations; advanced aspects of income, deductions, exclusions, and credits, especially as applied to tax problems of partnerships and corporations.
  • BUS-A 380 Professional Practice in Accounting (3-6 cr.) Provides work experience in a cooperating firm or agency. Comprehensive written report required. Grades of S or F are assigned by faculty.
  • BUS-A 422 Advanced Financial Accounting (3 cr.) Generally accepted accounting principles, as applied to partnerships, business combinations, branches, foreign operations, and nonprofit organizations. Particular emphasis on consolidated financial statements.
  • BUS-A 424 Auditing (3 cr.) Public accounting organization and operation; review of internal control, including EDP system; verification of balance sheet and operating accounts; statistical applications in auditing.
  • BUS-A 490 Independent Study in Accounting (1-3 cr.)
  • BUS-D 301 The International Business Environment (3 cr.) The national and international environmental aspects of international business. Examines the cultural, political, economic, systemic, legal-regulatory, trade, and financial environments; and how they affect the international business activities of firms in the United States and, selectively, in other countries.
  • BUS-D 302 International Business: Operations of International Enterprises (3 cr.) The administration of international aspects of business organizations through an examination of their policy formulation, forms of foreign operations, methods of organization and control, and functional adjustments.
  • BUS-D 496 Foreign Study in Business (3 cr.)
  • BUS-F 151 Personal Finances of the College Student (3 cr.) Introduction to the basic planning tools and concepts for college-age financial literacy.  Emphasis on financial decisions and challenges facing a typical college student.  Topics include, careers, goal setting, budgeting, tax planning and credit, including options for financing higher education.  Foundation of the Financial Literacy Curriculum.
  • BUS-F 301 Financial Management (3 cr.) Conceptual framework of the firm's investment, financing, and dividend decision; includes working capital management, capital budgeting, and capital structure strategies.
  • BUS-F 302 Financial Decision Making (3 cr.) Application of financial theory and techniques of analysis in the search of optimal solutions to financial management problems.
  • BUS-F 420 Equity and Fixed Income Investment (3 cr.) Conceptual and analytical frameworks for formulating investment policies, analyzing securities, and constructing portfolio strategies for individuals and institutions.
  • BUS-F 480 Professional Practice in Finance (3-6 cr.) Work experience is offered in cooperating firms and agencies. Comprehensive written report required. Grades of S or F are assigned by faculty.
  • BUS-F 490 Independent Study in Finance (1-3 cr.) Supervised individual study and research in a student's special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Written report required.
  • BUS-F 494 International Finance (3 cr.) Covers the international dimension of both investments and corporate finance. Develop strategies for investing internationally, including lodging exchange rate risk, adjusting to client preferences and home currencies, evaluating performance, estimating a corporation's exposure to real exchange rate risk, strategies to hedge risk or to dynamically adjust to shocks, and reasons for a corporation to hedge. Also covers international capital budgeting, multinational transfer pricing, and international cash management.
  • BUS-J 401 Administrative Policy (3 cr.) Administration of business organizations — policy formulation, organization, methods, and executive control.
  • BUS-J 404 Business and Society (3 cr.) Intellectual, philosophical, and scientific foundations of business. The business dynamic; its role in the evolution of enterprise and society from the small and simple to the large and complex; structure, discipline, and goals of a business society.
  • BUS-K 201 The Computer in Business (3 cr.) Introduction to digital computers and illustrations of their use in business. Stored program concept, types of languages, instruction in a special language, utilization of Business Computing Center. Impact of computers upon business management and organization. Note: Student may receive credit for only one of BUS-K 201, CSCI-C 201, and CSCI-C 301.
  • BUS-K 302 Introduction to Management Science (3 cr.) An introductory management science course with a forecasting component of approximately 25 percent of the course. Topics covered include multiple regression, smoothing techniques, linear programming, integer programming, statistical decision theory, simulation and network analysis; coverage may also include inventory theory, Markov process, and goal programming. Heavy emphasis on the application of these topics to business decision making using computer.
  • BUS-L 200 Elements of Business Law (3 cr.) This course introduces various legal rules governing contracts, their formation, performance, breach, and legal and equitable remedies. The primary focus will be on legal and equitable remedies. The primary focus will be on legal rules applicable to business. No credit toward a B.S.in Business; no credit for both BUS-L 200 or BUS-L 201.
  • BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.) Emphasis on the nature of law by examining a few areas of general interest: duty to avoid harming others (torts), duty to keep promises (contracts), and government regulation of business (trade regulation). Credit not given for both BUS-L 201 and BUS-L 302.
  • BUS-L 303 Commercial Law II (3 cr.) P: BUS-L 201. Covers the law of ownership, forms of business organization, commercial paper, and secured transactions. For accounting majors and others desiring a rather broad and detailed knowledge of commercial law.
  • BUS-L 406 Employment Problems and the Law (3 cr.) Current legal problems in the area of employment. Topics include race and sex discrimination, harassment, the American with Disabilities Act, employment at ill, privacy issues such as drug testing, and limits on monitoring and testing.
  • BUS-M 300 Introduction to Marketing (3 cr.) Examination of the market economy and marketing institutions in the U.S.  Decision making and planning from the manager's point of view; impact of marketing actions from the consumer's point of view.
  • BUS-M 301 Introduction to Marketing Management (3 cr.) Overview of marketing for all undergraduates. Marketing planning and decision making, examined from firm's and consumer's points of view; marketing concept and its company-wide implications; integration of marketing with other functions. Market structure and behavior and their relationship to marketing strategy. Marketing systems viewed in terms of both public and private policy in a pluralistic society.
  • BUS-M 405 Buyer Behavior (3 cr.) Description and explanation of consumer behavior in retail markets. Topics include demographic, socioeconomic, psychographic, attitudinal, and group influences on consumer decision making. Applications to promotion, product design, distribution, pricing, and segmentation strategies.
  • BUS-M 415 Advertising and Promotion Management (3 cr.) Basic advertising and sales-promotion concepts. The design, management, and integration of a firm's promotional strategy. Public policy aspects and the role of advertising in marketing communications in different cultures.
  • BUS-M 450 Marketing Strategy (3 cr.) Ideally taken in student's last semester. Elective capstone course for marketing majors. Draws on and integrates materials previously taken. Focuses on decision problems in marketing strategy and policy design, and application of analytical tools for marketing and decision making.
  • BUS-M 455 Topics in Marketing: Customer Relationship Marketing (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301 and BUS-S 302. Managing customer life cycle, customer retention, understanding relationships, strategic customer relationship management, customer service, social media, and social customer relationship management.
  • BUS-M 480 Professional Practice in Marketing (3-6 cr.) Work experience is provided in cooperating firms and agencies. Comprehensive written report required. Grades of S or F are assigned by the faculty.
  • BUS-M 490 Special Studies in Marketing (3-6 cr.) Offers supervised individual study and research in the student's field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, will develop the scope of the work to be completed. Comprehensive written report required.
  • BUS-P 301 Operations Management (3 cr.) Analysis of planning and control decisions made by the operations manager of any enterprise. Topics include forecasting, production and capacity planning, project planning, operations scheduling, inventory control, work measurement, and productivity improvement.
  • BUS-S 302 Management Information Systems (3 cr.) P: junior standing, BUS-K 201 or consent of instructor. Overview of management information systems (MIS) within a business context, MIS theory and practice as they relate to management and organization theories; current trends in MIS; managerial usage of information systems; computer hardware, software, and telecommunications; functional information systems; systems development process; the role of microcomputers. Experiential learning with widely used software packages.
  • BUS-W 100 Business Administration: Introduction (3 cr.) Business administration from the standpoint of a manager of a business firm operating in the contemporary economic, political, and social environment. No credit if taken in the junior or senior year.
  • BUS-W 430 Organizations and Organizational Change (3 cr.) Analysis and development of organizational theories, with emphasis on environmental dependencies, socio-technical systems, structural design, and control of the performance of complex systems. Issues in organizational change such as barriers to change, appropriateness of intervention strategies and techniques, organizational analysis, and evaluation of formal change programs.
  • BUS-W 480 Professional Practice in Management (3-6 cr.) Application filed through Professional Practice Programs office. Provides work experience in cooperating firm or agency. Comprehensive written report required. Grades of S or F are assigned by faculty.
  • BUS-W 490 Independent Study in Business Administration (1-6 cr.)
  • BUS-X 107 Freshman Seminar in Business (3 cr.) The Freshman Seminar in Business course is designed to assist freshman in their transition into college. This course provides students with the essential skills needed to succeed in college. Module I of this course focuses on student success; during the first 5 weeks, students will focus on study skills, team building, peer leadership, and interpersonal skills. Module II focuses on financial planning; students will focus on goal setting, budgeting, financial planning, cash management, and credit management. Module III focuses on career exploration; this final module allows students to begin thinking about their concentrations, their future, and what it will take to properly prepare themselves for their future careers.
  • BUS-X 293 Honors Seminar in Business (1-3 cr.) For student in the Business Honors Program. May be taken twice for credit.
  • BUS-X 410 Business Career Planning and Placement (1 cr.)
  • BUS-X 487 Seminar in Business Administration (3-6 cr.) Instruction of an interdisciplinary nature for student groups involved in university-related, nonprofit ventures. Interested groups must be sponsored by a School of Business faculty member, as approved by the Curriculum Management and Assurance of Learning Committee (CMALC). May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. Students must have a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0 to enroll in the course.
  • BUS-X 493 Honors Seminar in Business (1-3 cr.) For students in the Business Honors Program. May be repeated twice for credit.
  • BUS-Z 302 Managing and Behavior in Organizations (3 cr.) Integration of behavior and organizational theories. Application of concepts and theories toward improving individual, group, and organizational performance. Builds from a behavioral foundation toward an understanding of managerial processes. Credit given for only one of BUS-Z 300, BUS-Z 301, or BUS-Z 302.
  • BUS-Z 440 Personnel-Human Resource Management (3 cr.) Nature of human resource development and utilization in American society and organizations. Government programs and policies, labor force statistics, organizational personnel departments, personnel planning, forecasting, selection, training and development. Integration of government and organizational human resource programs.
  • BUS-Z 480 Professional Practice in Human Resource Management (3-6 cr.) Application filed through Professional Practice Programs office. Provides work experience in cooperating firm or agency. Comprehensive written report required. Grades of S or F assigned by faculty.
  • BUS-Z 490 Independent Study in Personnel Management and Organizational Behavior (1-3 cr.) For senior-year students with consent of instructor. Research, analysis, and discussion of current topics. Written report required.
  • CHEM-C 100 The World of Chemistry (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. For students requiring only one semester of chemistry. Descriptive course, including inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry, with illustrations of scientific reasoning. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 100, CHEM-C 101, or CHEM-C 105.
  • CHEM-C 101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Introduction to chemistry. The two sequences, CHEM-C 101-C 121 and CHEM-C 102-C 122, usually satisfy programs that require only two semesters of chemistry. Admission to advanced courses on basis of CHEM-C 101, 121, 102, 122 granted only in exceptional cases. May be taken without credit in preparation for CHEM-C 105. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 100, 101, or 105.
  • CHEM-C 102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.) Spring. Continuation of CHEM-C 101. The chemistry of organic compounds and their reactions, followed by an extensive introduction to biochemistry. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 102 and CHEM-C 106.  
  • CHEM-C 105 Principles of Chemistry I (3 cr.) Fall. Basic principles, including stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular structure, gases, solutions, and selected topics in descriptive chemistry. Credit given for only one of the following, CHEM-C 100, CHEM-C 101, or CHEM-C 105-125.
  • CHEM-C 106 Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.) Spring.  Chemical equilibrium with emphasis on acids, bases, solubility and electrochemistry, elementary thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and selected topics in descriptive chemistry. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 102, and CHEM-C 106-C 126. 
  • CHEM-C 109 Introductory Chemistry for Health and Nursing Sciences (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Designed for students with no prior chemistry background. Students will learn the role of chemistry in physiological, health, and nursing applications. Topics include the structure of matter, chemical reactions, structural characteristics of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.
  • CHEM-C 120 Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) Fall, Spring. For non-majors. An introduction to techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Experiments and projects illustrate topics studied in CHEM-C 100. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 120, 121 or 125*. 
  • CHEM-C 121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) Fall. An introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 121 and 125.*
  • CHEM-C 122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) Spring.  Continuation of CHEM-C 121. Emphasis on organic and biochemical experimental techniques. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 122 and 126.*  
  • CHEM-C 125 Experimental Chemistry I (2 cr.) Fall.  Introduction to laboratory experimentation, with particular emphasis on the collection and use of experimental data, some properties of solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and synthesis. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 121, or 125.* 
  • CHEM-C 126 Experimental Chemistry II (2 cr.) Spring.  A continuation of CHEM-C 125 with emphasis on equilibria; qualitative analysis; acids and bases; oxidation-reduction reactions including electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and synthesis. Credit given for only one of the following: CHEM-C 126, or 122.*  
  • CHEM-C 250 Introduction to genomics, proteomics and transcri (3 cr.) The aim of this course is to explain the molecular basis of the control of gene expression and to provide a comprehensive picture of the recent field of genomic sciences.  Topics will include an advanced investigation of regulation of gene expression at RNA and protein level; functional and comparative genomics; and molecular biotechnology techniques.  Computer exercises will involve learning genome annotation, sequence alignment and analysis using bioinformatics tools.
  • CHEM-C 300 Energy and Green Chemistry - A Natural Science Perspective (3-4 cr.) An introduction to topics in existing and potential renewable sources of energy, including hydroelectric, geothermal, tidal, wind and solar energy.
  • CHEM-C 310 Analytical Chemistry (3 cr.) Spring.  Fundamental analytical processes including solution equilibria, theory and applications of electrochemistry and spectrophotometry, and chemical methods of separation.
  • CHEM-C 311 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) Spring.  Laboratory instruction in the fundamental analytical techniques discussed in CHEM-C 310.*  
  • CHEM-C 329 Biochemistry I: Proteins and Enzymes (3 - 5 cr.) This course focuses on protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms.  Topics in bioinformatics are covered.  The laboratory studies methods to isolate, purify, and identify enzymes and proteins.  Determination of enzyme kinetics.
  • CHEM-C 340 Biochemistry II: Bioenergetics and Metabolism (5 cr.) This course focuses on bioenergetics, oxidative phosphorylation, and metabolic pathways for sugars, fatty acids, and amino acids. Topics covered will include current resereach in biochemistry, bioinformatics, and a discussion about the role of biochemistry in understanding cellular functions. The lab exercises focus on methods to determine the types of and the concentration of a variety of metabolic compounds. The topics covered will include enzymatic conversion of moleculaes and separation of molecules by chromatography.
  • CHEM-C 341 Organic Chemistry I: Lecture (3 cr.) Fall.  Chemistry of carbon compounds; nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes and monofunctional compounds.  
  • CHEM-C 342 Organic Chemistry II: Lecture (3 cr.) Spring.  Syntheses and reactions of polyfunctional compounds, natural and industrial products, physical and chemical methods of identification.  
  • CHEM-C 343 Organic Chemistry I: Laboratory (2 cr.) Fall.  Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry and the use of general synthetic methods.*  
  • CHEM-C 344 Organic Chemistry II: Laboratory (2 cr.) Spring. Preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds. Emphasis on modern research methods.*
  • CHEM-C 361 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.) Fall. Alternate years.  Chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, introduction to statistical thermodynamics.  
  • CHEM-C 362 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr.) Introduction to quantum mechanics. Structure and spectra of atoms, molecules, and solids. 
  • CHEM-C 390 Special Topics (3 cr.) “Environmental Science” topic (3 cr.): For non-majors. Exploration of the complex interrelationships among the physical, chemical, biological, cultural, economic, and political forces that shape the global environment. “Sustainability” topic (3 cr.): For non-majors. A broad consideration of the impact of past and current human endeavor on the challenges being created for future generations, with an emphasis on the consequences of climate change, energy source choices, resource availability, the role of science in political decisions, and human rights. Note: CHEM-C 390 will not count toward a Bloomington or Kokomo chemistry degree. Can be repeated for credits with different topics.
  • CHEM-C 400 Chemical Information Sources and Services (1 cr.) Techniques for the storage and retrieval of chemical information in both printed and computer-readable formats; sources of chemical information, including Chemical Abstracts; development of search strategies; online searching of chemical databases. 
  • CHEM-C 409 Chemical Research (1-3 cr.) For outstanding students. To be elected only after consultation with the faculty research advisor. Cannot be substituted for any course required in the chemistry major. A research thesis is required.
  • CHEM-C 410 Principles of Chemical Instrumentation (2-4 cr.) Modern methods of instrumental analysis, including spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrochemistry. 
  • CHEM-C 430 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) Alternate years. Structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, survey of chemistry of nonmetal and metal elements, coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, mechanisms and reactions.  
  • CHEM-C 443 Organic Spectroscopy (3 cr.) Elucidation of molecular structures by use of IR, UV, NMR, mass spectroscopy, and other methods.*  
  • CHEM-C 483 Biological Chemistry Lecture (3 cr.) Introduction to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of biological substances.  
  • CHEM-C 487 Biochemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of biochemistry, including separation of macromolecules by electrophoresis and chromatography; isolation, purification and analysis of enzymes; recombinant DNA procedures; and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • CHEM-C 495 Capstone in Chemistry (1-3 cr.) Independent study or regular class, under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member or appropriate academic advisor can be earned by completion of (a) a chemical research project; (b) a library research project in an area of current scientific investigation; (c) a research investigation in industry; (d) a service activity in university, government, public schools, or other science-related groups or organizations; or (e) a current topics class concerned with various issues in biochemistry and chemistry. Students will report the results of their activities in both a formal written report and oral presentation, prepare portfolios of undergraduate work in chemistry, discuss recent scientific literature, and explore chemistry in society. Enrollment in the Capstone in Chemistry requires approval.
  • CHEM-Y 398 Professional Practice in Chemistry (1-6 cr.) Designed to provide opportunities for students to receive credit for career-related, full-time work. 
  • CJHS-J 101 American Criminal Justice System (3 cr.) Introduction to elements of the criminal justice system: the police, the courts, and corrections, and how they function in contemporary American society. CJHS-J 101 is a prerequisite to all criminal justice classes.
  • CJHS-J 201 Theoretical Foundations of Criminal Justice Policies (3 cr.) This course examines the impact of sociological, biological, and economic theories of crime and the practice of criminal justice. Focus is upon the natural and importance of theory, context of theoretical developments, methods for the critical analysis of theoretical developments, and policy implications of the varying perspectives considered.
  • CJHS-J 202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods and Resources (3 cr.) Course examines basic concepts of criminal justice. Students become familiar with research techniques necessary for systematic analysis of the criminal justice system, offender behavior, crime trends, and program effectiveness. Students will learn to critically evaluate existing research. Students will become familiar with existing sources of criminal justice data and will learn to assess the quality of that data.
  • CJHS-J 260 Topics in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) This course introduces students to special topics in criminal justice.
  • CJHS-J 272 Terrorism and Public Policy (3 cr.) Survey of the incidence of terrorism in demorcatic societies, with particular emphasis on public policy responses designed to combat terrorism in cities. Overviews of ongoing conflicts with terrorist organizations in various countries are interspersed with analysis of significant terrorist events and public policies and responses such events create.
  • CJHS-J 275 Introduction to Emergency Management (3 cr.) An examination of the background an nature of the profession, the central theoretical debates concerning natural and human-induced disasters, mitigating and reacting to these castastrophic events and the roles and responsibilites of emergancy managers. Current practical problems and future directions will be explored.
  • CJHS-J 278 Principles and Practices in Homeland Security (3 cr.) An examination of the basic operations, functions, and issues involved in securing our homeland from domestic and international threats including possible threats and proactive and reactive measures against such threats.
  • CJHS-J 301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.) The development, limitations, and applications of substansive criminal law utilizing the case-study method.
  • CJHS-J 302 Procedural Criminal Law (3 cr.) Criminal Law application and procedure from the initiation of police activity throught the correctional process utilizing the case-study method.
  • CJHS-J 303 Evidence (3 cr.) The rules of law governing proof at trial of disputed issues of fact; burden of proof; presumptions and judicial notice; examination, impeachment, competency, and privlages of witnesses hearsay rule and exceptions. All related as nearly as possible to criminal as opposed to civil process.
  • CJHS-J 304 Correctional Law (3 cr.) Legal problems from conviction to release: pre-sentence investigations, sentencing, probation and parole, incarceration, loss and restoration of civil rights.
  • CJHS-J 305 The Juvenile Justice System (3 cr.) Current developments in the legal, administrative, and operational aspects of the juvenile justice system.
  • CJHS-J 306 The Criminal Courts (3 cr.) An analysis of the criminal justice process from prosecution through appeal. The organization and operation of felony and misdemeanor courts are examined. Topics include prosecutorial desision-making, plea bargining, judicial selection, the conduct of trials, sentencing, and appeal.
  • CJHS-J 310 Introduction to Administrative Processes (3 cr.) Introduction to principles of management and systems theory for the administration of criminal justice agencies.
  • CJHS-J 320 Criminal Investigation (3 cr.) Theory of investigation; crime scene procedures; interviews, interrogations, surveillance and sources of information; collection and preservation of physical evidence; investigative techniques in specific crimes.
  • CJHS-J 321 American Policing (3 cr.) A broadly based study of the operations and interrelationships of the American police system, including discussion of the limitations of the police function, inter-juristictional matters, and intra-agency processes.
  • CJHS-J 322 Introduction to Criminalistics (3 cr.) R: CJHS-J 301. The broad range of physical evidence developed through the investigative process, and methods of identifying and establishing validity and relevance through forensic laboratory techniques.
  • CJHS-J 331 Corrections (3 cr.) A survey of contempory correctional systems, including analysis of federal, state, and local corrections; adult and juvenile facilities and programs; probation and parole. This course is not open to students who have not completed SOC-S 420 Topics in Deviance: Corrections.
  • CJHS-J 355 Global Criminal Justice Perspectives (3 cr.) This course will survey various criminal justice systems from a variety of cultures and regions of the world. Particular attention will be given to the contrast of eastern and western systems, as well as systems that do not fit neatly into established categories.
  • CJHS-J 370 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) Selected contempory topics in criminal justice. May be repeted for credit.
  • CJHS-J 380 Internship in Criminal Justice (1-6 cr.) May be repeated for credit. Course grade is S/F (Satisfactory/Fail). Students are placed with a criminal justice agency for assigned tasks. Students also complete an academic component.
  • CJHS-J 387 Foundations of Homeland Security (3 cr.) An examination of the theory and research driving homeland security and emergency management measures and an analytical look at the practices and principles of homeland security from an empirical perspective.
  • CJHS-J 388 Public Administration and Emergency Management (3 cr.) An examination of the American federal system and how it affects policy making and emergancy management. Topics include: government programs, participation of agencies and actors from all three levels of the government, the nonprofit sector, and the private sector. Administrative processes involved in managing major hazards and disastors will be presented.
  • CJHS-J 439 Crime and Public Policy (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to the major efforts designed to control or reduce crime. A review of existing knowledge is followed by an investigation of current crime control theories, proposals, and programs.
  • CJHS-J 440 Corrections in the Community (3 cr.) An introduction to correctional alternatives to incarceration that focus on the reintegration of the offender while remaining in the community. Because of their extensive use, considerable attention is given to probation and parole. Other topics include diversion, community residential programs, restitution, halfway houses, and home detention.
  • CJHS-J 460 Police in the Community (3 cr.) In-depth examination of crime as an urban policy problem; focusing on the role of police and victims in defining crime as a policy problem, and their role in seeking to reduce the incidence of crime.
  • CJHS-J 470 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) Emphasizes current developments in legal, administrative, and operational aspects of the criminal justice stystem.
  • CJHS-J 480 Research in Criminal Justice (1-6 cr.) Individual research under guidance of faculty member.
  • CLAS-C 209 Medical Terms from Greek and Latin (2 cr.) This course introduces students to the process by which technical medical terms are formed.
  • CMLT-C 190 Introduction to Film (3 cr.) History of film and growth of cinematic techniques from Melies and the Lumiere brothers to the present. Topics such as adaptation, the visual image, genres, and the film as social document, and how they relate to the history and development of film art. Students will become familiar with the basic terminology and technical aspects of film study.
  • CMLT-C 390 Film and Society (3 cr.) P: CMLT-C 190 or consent of instructor. Film and politics; censorship; social influences of the cinema; and rise of the film industry.
  • CMLT-C 392 Genre Study in Film (3 cr.) P: CMLT-C 190 or consent of instructor. Problems of definition; the evolution of film genres such as criminal or social drama, comedy, the western, science fiction, horror, or documentary film; themes, subject matter, conventions, and iconography peculiar to given genres; relationship of film genres to literary genres. Focus is on one specific genre each time the course is offered. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • COMM-C 394 Communication and Conflict (3 cr.) Analyzes conflict as a form of interaction. Examines approaches/perspectives to the study of conflict, the nature of power, face saving and contentious behaviors. Specific contexts include relational, marital, group and organizational. Special attention to bargaining and mediation.  
  • CSCI-B 100 Problem Solving Using Computers (4 cr.) This course introduces problem solving techniques, critical thinking skills, algorithm development, and computer programming, using real world problems. Topics include: computer literacy, hardware, data representation, structured and object oriented programming techniques, modularity and reusability, and testing and debugging techniques.
  • CSCI-B 401 Fundamentals of Computing Theory (3 cr.) Fundamentals of formal language theory, computation models and computability, the limits of computability and feasibility, and program verification.
  • CSCI-B 438 Fundamentals of computer networks (3-4 cr.) History, theory, and design of data communication between devices. Topics include history of computer networks, network architecture and topology, local- and wide-area networks, ISO network layers, current and future IEEE standards for networks, and network operating systems.
  • CSCI-C 100 Computing Tools (1 cr.) An introduction to computing applications useful in college work. Microcomputer systems, word processing, spreadsheets, graphics, e-mail and Web browsers are used.
  • CSCI-C 101 Computer Programming 1 (4 cr.) Fundamental concepts of computer programming, algorithm development, and data structuring.
  • CSCI-C 106 Introduction to Computers and Their Use (3 cr.) Introduction to computers and data processing. Includes the historical and current status of data processing and digital computers, a survey of computer applications, foundations of computer programming, survey of programming languages, and the fundamentals of a programming language such as Visual Basic.
  • CSCI-C 201 Computer Programming 2 (4 cr.) Introduction to computer science, introduction to algorithm design, programming, and analysis. Using Java and/or other programming languages, this course covers procedural and data abstractions, and use of several programming paradigms including functional, imperative, and object-oriented.
  • CSCI-C 250 Discrete Structures (3 cr.) Mathematical foundations of computing including: set theory, propositional and predicate logic, arguments and patterns of inference, proofs of correctness, and mathematical induction. Formal logic, argumentation and verification (proof) are also examined in the context of 'every day' critical thinking.
  • CSCI-C 308 System Analysis & Design (3 cr.) The software development life cycle; data flow diagrams, entity relationship modeling, structured design, validation, user interfaces; implementation and testing. A team project will be completed.
  • CSCI-C 311 Programming Languages (3 cr.) Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties, and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-C 335 Computer Structures (4 cr.) Computer architecture and machine language, internal data representation, assembly systems, macros, program segmentation and linking, I/O devices, and serial communication. Projects to illustrate basic machine structure and programming techniques.
  • CSCI-C 343 Data Structures (3-4 cr.) Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems, structure and use of storage media, methods of representing structured data, and techniques for operating on data structures. 
  • CSCI-C 400 Client-Server Programming for the Web (3-4 cr.) This course teaches students how to develop interactive and dynamic client-server applications for the World Wide Web. Using a client-side web programming language such as JavaScript and a server-side language such as PHP, students will learn the fundamentals of front-end and back-end web programming.
  • CSCI-C 436 Operating Systems (4 cr.) Organization and construction of computer systems that manage computational resources. Topics include specification and implementation of concurrency, process scheduling, storage management, device handlers, and mechanisms for event coordination such as interruption, exclusion and synchronization. Extensive laboratory exercises.
  • CSCI-C 442 Database Systems (3 cr.) Study of fundamental concepts, theory and practices in design and implementation of database management systems. Topics include data independence, data modeling, entity-relationship  modeling, functional dependencies, normalization, relational, hierarchical, network and object oriented data models, relational algebra, relational calculus, data definition and manipulation languages, recovery, concurrency, security, and integrity of data.
  • CSCI-C 455 Analysis of Algorithms 1 (3-4 cr.) Algorithm design methodology. General methods for analysis of algorithms. Analysis of the performance of specific algorithms, such as those for searching and sorting.
  • CSCI-C 490 Seminar in Computer Science (3 cr.) Special topics in computer science and/or a capstone course.
  • EALC-E 100 East Asia: An Introduction (3 cr.) Basic introduction to China, Japan, and Korea. Intended to help students understand the unique character of each of these three cultures within the general framework of East Asian civilization, comprehend the historical importance of the three countries, and appreciate the crucial role they play in the world today.
  • ECON-E 200 Fundamentals of Economics (3 cr.) Study of the basic institutions of market economy and the role they play in defining and pursuing economic goals in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed upon the effects of existing economic institutions; current economic policy alternatives as they affect both the individual and the society. No credit toward a B.S. in Business; no credit for both ECON-E 200 and ECON-E 201.
  • ECON-E 201 Introduction of Microeconomics (3 cr.) Scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive market pricing, and interdependence as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems such as poverty, pollution, excise taxes, rent controls, and farm subsidies.
  • ECON-E 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.) Measuring and explaining total economic performance, money, and monetary and fiscal policy as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and underdeveloped countries.
  • ECON-E 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory in Economics and Business (3 cr.) Review of basic probability concepts. Sampling, inference, and testing statistical hypotheses. Applications of regression and correlation theory, analysis of variance, and elementary decision theory. Credit not given for both ECON-E 270, PSY-K 300 and MATH-K 310.
  • ECON-E 300 Survey of Economics (3 cr.) Provides the macroeconomic and microeconomic understanding that mangers will use throughout their careers. Microeconomic topics include supply and demand, pricing, production and costs, and applications of microeconomic theory. Macroeconomic topics include international economics, monetary and fiscal policies, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and models of the macro economy. This course does NOT count towards an undergraduate degree in business.
  • ECON-E 307 Current Economic Issues: Game Theory (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. Current economic issues, problems, and research methods.  Designed to in depth an economic issue currently before the public or to examine a particular aspect of the methodology of economics.  Examples would be a study of the economic aspects of discrimination, a study of urban economic policy, or a study of simplified models in economics.
  • ECON-H 203 Introduction to Microeconomics Honors (3 cr.) For students in the Honors Program.
  • EDUC-E 325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) Emphasizes the development of objectives, teaching strategies, and evaluation procedures that facilitate the social learning of young children. Special attention given to concept learning, inquiry, decision making and value analysis.
  • EDUC-E 328 Science in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) Objectives, philosophy, selection, and organization of science materials and methods. Concept development and use of the multidimensional materials in science experiments. Analysis of assessment techniques and bibliographical materials. Field experience arranged in public schools.
  • EDUC-E 335 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) This course has a dual focus: The first involves an overview of the field including an historic perspective, program models, goals of early childhood education, and professional organizations. The second emphasizes the study of observation skills, the characteristics of young children, teacher-child interaction, and classroom management skills.
  • EDUC-E 339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary Schools I (3 cr.) Describes the methods, materials, and techniques employed in the elementary language arts program.
  • EDUC-E 340 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Elementary Schools I (3 cr.) Focuses on materials, methods, and techniques employed in a developmental reading program. Field experience arranged in public schools.
  • EDUC-E 341 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Elementary Schools II (3 cr.) Focuses on classroom procedures and materials used to provide diagnostic and corrective instruction for learning needs in reading.
  • EDUC-E 343 Mathematics in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P EDUC-M 299, MATH-T 109, and MATH-T 110. Emphasizes the developmental nature of the arithmetic process and its place as an effective tool in the experiences of the elementary school child. Field experience arranged in public schools.**
  • EDUC-E 349 Teaching and Learning for All Young Children I: Focus on Birth to Age 3 (3 cr.) skills in real-life settings with typically and atypically developing young children, birth to age three. They will learn how to become keen observers of children, and will acquire proficiency in designing, implementing, and assessing environments that are developmentally appropriate and literacy-rich.**
  • EDUC-E 352 Teaching and Learning in Preschool/Kindergarten II (6 cr.) This course engages students in the development, implementation, and assessment of curricula for all children ages 3-5 years. Content areas of mathematics, social studies, science, literacy, and art will be emphasized.
  • EDUC-E 353 Foundations of Early Care and Education: III (6 cr.) Students will examine how historical, social, cultural, and political factors influence the growth, development, and learning of the K-3 child. They will examine how these factors influence the K-3 child's educational experiences and how programs should be designed to address the needs of all children.
  • EDUC-E 354 Teaching and Learning for All Young Children: III Focus on K/Primary (6 cr.) This course engages students in the development, implementation, and assessment of curricula for all children in K-Grade 3 classrooms. Content areas of mathematics, social studies, science, literacy, and art will be emphasized.
  • EDUC-E 490 Research in Elementary Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research.
  • EDUC-F 205 Study of Education and the Practice of Teaching (3 cr.) A review of the literature on various approaches to education as a discipline and a field of inquiry, and an exploration of several approaches to teacher education. Integrates scholarship and inquiry with the development of educational possibilities. Students will begin the process of constructing a set of personal and social commitments that will guide their future teaching activities.
  • EDUC-H 340 Education and the American Culture (3 cr.) The present educational system - its social impact and future implications - viewed in historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives. Special attention is given to ethnic, minority, and cultural aspects.
  • EDUC-K 205 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) An overview of the characteristics and the identification of exceptional children. The course presents the issues in serving exceptional children and the educational, recreational, and social aspects of their lives.
  • EDUC-K 305 Teaching Students with Special Needs in the Elementary Classroom (3 cr.) Knowledge, attitudes, and skills basic to the education of exceptional learners (students who are handicapped as well as gifted and talented in the regular elementary classroom. Topics include historical and international perspectives, the law and public policy, profiling the exceptional learner, a responsive curriculum, teaching and management strategies, teachers as persons and professionals.
  • EDUC-K 306 Teaching Students with Special Needs in the Secondary Classroom (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 205. This course includes an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for effective instruction of students with disabilities in inclusive secondary programs. **
  • EDUC-K 343 Emotional and Behavioral Disorders I (3 cr.) A basic survey of the field of emotional disturbance and social maladjustment. Definitions, classifications, characteristics, and diagnostic and treatment procedures are discussed from a psycho-educational point of view.
  • EDUC-K 344 Emotional and Behavioral Disorders II (3 cr.) A survey of educational curricula, procedures, and materials for socially and emotionally disturbed children. Development of teaching skills is emphasized.
  • EDUC-K 352 Learning Disability Methods (3 cr.) Educational programs for optimum growth and development of educable mentally retarded and learning disabled children. Study and observation of curriculum content, organization of special schools and classes, and teaching methods and materials.
  • EDUC-K 361 Assistive Technology (2 cr.) Prepares future teachers with the knowledge required to integrate assistive technology into curricula for students with mild to moderate disabilities.
  • EDUC-K 362 Team Approaches to Educating Students with Disabilites (3 cr.) Students will learn techniques related to effective collaboration and interactive teaming in educational settings. Focus will be the development of skills necessary to serve as consultant or co-teacher in school environments.
  • EDUC-K 370 Language and Learning Disorder (3 cr.) Survey of historical development and current status of definitions, classifications, assessment, and treatment procedures for learning-disabled students.
  • EDUC-K 371 Assessment and Individualized Instruction in Reading and Math (3 cr.) Emphasizes assessment and remediation procedures that address reading and math problems of mildly handicapped students.
  • EDUC-K 441 Transition Across the Lifespan (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 362. Gives prospective teachers the information and skills necessary to effectively teach students with disabilities at the high school level. An overview of characteristics of secondary students with mild disabilities, school programs, transition from school life to adult life, curriculum issues, and strategies of effective instruction for students with disabilities will be covered.
  • EDUC-K 488 Student Teaching in Special Education (6 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to teach exceptional children under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher and a university special education supervisor.**
  • EDUC-K 490 Topical Seminar: Assessment 1 (3 cr.) Assessment and Instruction This seminar assists students in gaining knowledge of formal and informal assessment techniques; how to link assessment to curriculum and instruction; and how to effectively choose, construct, deliver, and evaluate curriculum and instruction to students with diverse learning needs
  • EDUC-K 495 Special Education Field Experience (1 cr.) Part A - P: EDUC-K 343, EDUC-K 370. Provides the student with a field-based, supervised experience with individuals with severe handicaps. It allows the opportunity to interact within school/ work/community settings on a daily basis (three hours/day, five days/week). Specific assignments, which are mutually agreed upon between student, cooperating teacher, and practicum supervisor, are also required.**
  • EDUC-K 495 Special Education Field Experience (2 cr.) Part B - P: EDUC-K 495A. Provides the student with a field-based, supervised experience with individuals with severe handicaps. It allows the opportunity to interact within school/ work/community settings on a daily basis (three hours/day, five days/week). Specific assignments, which are mutually agreed upon between student, cooperating teacher, and practicum supervisor, are also required.**
  • EDUC-M 199 Passing scores on PRAXIS I (0 cr.) Beginning January 1, 2013, for admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) students will take the Pearson Core Academic Skills Assessment.
  • EDUC-M 210 Leadership, Diversity, and Social Justice (3 cr.)  This course is built on intellectual and experiential engagement with issues of difference, diversity, social justice, and alliance building. In a multicultural society that is culturally diverse yet socially stratified, discussions about difference, community and conflict are important to facilitate understanding among different social and cultural groups. This course will explore a broad range of social identities. In this course, students will understand the pluralistic nature of institutions, society, and culture in the United States and across the world in order to become educated, productive, and principled citizens/leaders. Personal and societal biases will be analyzed regarding: race, gender, socio-economic status, culture, sexual orientation, religion, second language learners and persons with special needs.
  • EDUC-M 299 Admission to Teacher Education Program (0 cr.)
  • EDUC-M 300 Teaching in a Pluralistic Society (3 cr.) These courses are designed to introduce the students to teaching as a profession. Students focus upon the self as teacher, learning styles, cultural pluralism, and classroom teaching strategies that respond positively to the personal and ethnic diversity of the learner.
  • EDUC-M 311 General Methods for Kindergarten/Elementary Teachers (1 cr.) Explores individualized and interdisciplinary learning methods, measurement and evaluation, teaching process and curriculum development, and organization of the elementary schools.
  • EDUC-M 313 General Methods for Secondary Education (1 cr.) Explores individualized and interdisciplinary learning methods, measurement and evaluation, teaching process and curriculum development, and organization of the secondary schools.
  • EDUC-M 323 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary Schools (2 cr.) Fundamental procedures of teaching elementary school music, stressing music material suitable for the first six grades.
  • EDUC-M 333 Art Experience for the Elementary Teacher (2 cr.) The selection, organization, guidance, and evaluation of art activities, both individual and group. Laboratory experiences with materials and methods of presenting projects.
  • EDUC-M 416 Inquiry into Secondary English Methods: High School (3 cr.) Study of current trends, issues, theory, and research in teaching and learning English/Language Arts. Explores language, composition, literature, and media arts; developing multicultural curricula; and engaging students in meaningful inquiry facilitating students’ responsibility for themselves and their world.**
  • EDUC-M 423 Student Teaching: Early Childhood (6 cr.) Full-time supervised student teaching for a minimum of eight weeks in a preschool identified by the university. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university provided supervision.**
  • EDUC-M 424 Student Teaching: Kindergarten-Primary (6 cr.) Full-time supervised student teaching for a minimum of eight weeks in a kindergarten or primary grade in a school accredited by the state of Indiana. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university-provided supervision.**
  • EDUC-M 425 Student Teaching in the Elementary Schools (9-15 cr.) Classroom teaching and other activities associated with the work of the full-time elementary classroom teacher. Minimum of 14 weeks.**
  • EDUC-M 430 Foundations of Art Education and Methods II (3 cr.) Advanced study of curriculum developments in art education. Special attention is given to art teaching in secondary schools.**
  • EDUC-M 437 Teaching Science 5-12 (3 cr.) Focuses on curriculum decisions teachers make every day. Specifically, students in this course will examine current learning theories and apply these theories to instructional practices at the middle grades and high school.
  • EDUC-M 440 Teaching Problems and Issues (3 cr.) Seminar taught as a co-requisite with early childhood (EDUC-M 423), kindergarten/primary (EDUC-M 424), elementary (EDUC-M 425), and/or middle/junior high school (EDUC-M 470) student teaching experiences. This seminar will address several issues related to the process of becoming a teacher.
  • EDUC-M 441 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Social Studies (3 cr.) Develops concepts and theories from social science, humanities, and education into practices of successful social studies instruction. Integrates social issues and reflective thinking skills into the social studies curriculum. Emphasis on curriculum development skills and building a repertoire of teaching strategies appropriate for middle/secondary school learners.**
  • EDUC-M 442 Teaching Secondary School Social Studies (3 cr.) I Includes consideration of philosophical and psychological perspectives, development and practice of skills and techniques, selection of content and materials, and evaluation of student and teacher performance. Micro-teaching laboratory included.**
  • EDUC-M 446 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Science (3 cr.) Designed for students who plan to teach biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, or physics in junior high/middle school or secondary school.
  • EDUC-M 452 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School English (3 cr.) Methods, techniques, content, and materials applicable to the teaching of English in the secondary school. Field experiences with secondary students and teachers provided to assess ongoing programs in public schools and to study materials appropriate for these programs.**
  • EDUC-M 457 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Mathematics (3 cr.) Study of methodology, heuristics of problem solving, curriculum design, instructional computing, professional affiliations, and teaching of daily lessons in the domain of secondary and/or junior high/middle school mathematics.**
  • EDUC-M 459 Teaching Mathematics 5-12 (3 cr.) Focuses on the curriculum and instruction issues that teachers make every day in the classroom. Specifically, students in the course will examine current theories and apply these theories to instructional practices.**
  • EDUC-M 464 Methods of Teaching Reading (3 cr.) Focuses on middle, junior high, and senior high school. Curriculum, methods, and materials for teaching students to read more effectively.**
  • EDUC-M 480 Student Teaching: Secondary (1-14 cr.) Full-time supervised student teaching in the student’s major certification area and in the grades included within a high school, or at another level if the major area permits; within the state of Indiana unless the integral program includes student teaching in an approved and accredited out-of state site. Each student assumes, under the direction of the selected supervising teacher and with university-provided supervision, responsibility for teaching in the cooperating school. Grade: S or F.**
  • EDUC-P 251 Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.) The application of psychological concepts to school learning and teaching using the perspective of development from childhood through preadolescence. Special attention is devoted to the needs of the handicapped.
  • EDUC-P 255 Educational Psychology for Middle and Secondary School Teachers (3 cr.) The application of psychological concepts to school learning and teaching in the perspective of development from the beginning of preadolescence adolescence. Special attention is devoted to the needs of the handicapped.
  • EDUC-P 290 Professional Practices: Education (2 cr.) Provides students with knowledge of basic concepts in physical education and potential outcomes of preschool and elementary school motor development programs. Further, the implementation and evaluation of such programs and appropriate movement experiences for young children will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on curriculum planning and design that is developmentally appropriate.
  • EDUC-P 348 Foundations of Child Growth and Development: Focus on Birth to Age 3 (3 cr.) Students will examine historical as well as contemporary theories of child growth and development for typically and atypically developing children throughout the early childhood period. All facets of development will be examined including physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive development. Particular focus will be on prenatal to age three development.
  • EDUC-P 351 Foundations of Child Development: Focus on 3 to 8 year old children (3 cr.) Students will examine child growth and development for typically and atypically developing children, including physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive development. Particular focus will be on 3- to 8-year old children.
  • EDUC-Q 200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (3 cr.) Course provides the elementary education major with background in the science process skills needed to complete required science courses.**
  • EDUC-S 487 Principles of SH/JR/MD School Education (3 cr.) Designed to provide an overview of the basic theories underlying the senior high/junior high/middle school in American Education as well as an examination of the subject areas, problems, trends, challenges for the future.
  • EDUC-W 200 Computers in Education: An Introduction (3 cr.) Required of all students pursuing teacher certification. Introduction to instructional computing, educational computing literature, and BASIC programming. Review of and applied experience with educational software packages and commonly used microcomputer hardware. For education majors only.
  • EDUC-X 460 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.) Examines use of trade books and non-text materials for teaching Language Arts and Reading K-8. Special sessions may focus on specific student populations.
  • EDUC-X 490 Research in Reading (1-6 cr.) Individual research.
  • ENG-E 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) Acquaints the student with contemporary studies of the nature of language in general and of the English language in particular.
  • ENG-E 301 Literatures in English Medieval to 1600 (3 cr.) Representative study of British and American literature from Medieval through the 1600s
  • ENG-E 302 Literatures in English 1600-1800 (3 cr.) Representative study of British and American literature of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries in the context of transatlantic cultural developments.
  • ENG-E 303 Literatures in English 1800-1900 (3 cr.) Representative study of nineteenth-century British and American literature in the context of transatlantic cultural developments.
  • ENG-E 304 Literatures in English 1900-Present (3 cr.) Representative study of twentieth-century literatures in English. In addition to Britain and North America, cultural locations may include the Indian subcontinent, Australasia, Anglophone Africa, the Caribbean, etc. Focus on themes associated with modernity and cross-cultural contacts such as multiculturalism, gender, and identity. 
  • ENG-L 100 Freshman Literature 1 (3 cr.) Various works of fiction and poetry pertaining to a selected theme or cultural issue. Introduces students to contemporary literature and its place in American culture. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 101 Western World Masterpieces I (3 cr.) Literary masterpieces from Homer to Chaucer. Aims to teach thoughtful, intensive reading and to introduce students to the aesthetic values of the classical literary heritage of Western literature.
  • ENG-L 102 Western World Masterpieces II (3 cr.) Literary masterpieces from Shakespeare to the present. Introduces the student to the literature of the modern world and its aesthetic and philosophical values. May be taken before ENG-L 101.
  • ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.) Close analysis of representative texts (poetry, drama, fiction) designed to develop the art of lively, responsible reading through class discussion and writing of papers. Attention to literary design and critical method.
  • ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) Representative significant plays to acquaint students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature. Readings will include plays from several ages and countries.
  • ENG-L 204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.) Representative works of fiction; structural techniques in the novel. Novels and stories from several ages and countries.
  • ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.) Kinds, conventions, and elements of poetry in a selection of poems from several historical periods.
  • ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Issues and approaches to the critical study of women writers and their treatment in British and American literature.
  • ENG-L 209 Topics in American Literature and Culture (3 cr.) Selected works of American literature in relation to a single cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.) Rapid reading of at least a dozen of Shakespeare's major plays and poems. May not be taken concurrently with ENG-L 313 or ENG-L 314.
  • ENG-L 225 Introduction to World Masterpieces (3 cr.) Representative masterpieces in all genres from world literature of any period.
  • ENG-L 230 Science Fiction (3 cr.) Study of the kinds, conventions, and theories of science fiction. Course may include both literature (predominantly British and American) and film.
  • ENG-L 295 American Film Culture (3 cr.) Film in relation to American culture and society. Topic varies. Works of literature may be used for comparison, but the main emphasis will be on film as a narrative medium and as an important element in American culture.
  • ENG-L 308 Elizabethan and 17th Century Drama (3 cr.) English drama from Shakespeare’s time to the closing of the theaters in 1642 and beyond.
  • ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare’s major plays.
  • ENG-L 320 Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature (3 cr.) Major poetry and prose with emphasis on Dryden, Swift, and Pope.
  • ENG-L 327 Later Eighteenth-Century Literature (3 cr.) Major poetry and prose 1730-1800 with emphasis on Johnson and Boswell.
  • ENG-L 331 Studies in 19th Century British Literature (3 cr.) British authors; groups of authors; genres and modes. Topic varies.
  • ENG-L 332 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) Major Romantic writers,with emphasis on two or more of the following: Blake, Wordsworth Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.
  • ENG-L 335 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) Major poetry and prose, studied against social and intellectual background of the period.
  • ENG-L 346 Twentieth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.) Modern fiction and its techniques and experiments. Particular emphasis is on Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later novelists may be included.
  • ENG-L 347 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.) Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.
  • ENG-L 348 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.) Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
  • ENG-L 350 Early American Writing and Culture to 1800 (3 cr.) Broad survey of American writers in Colonial, Revolutionary, and Republican periods.
  • ENG-L 351 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature I (3 cr.) American writers to 1865. Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 352 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature II (3 cr.) American writers 1865-1914: Twain, Dickinson, James, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 354 American Literature Since 1914 (3 cr.) American writers since 1914: Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot, Frost, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 355 American Fiction to 1900 (3 cr.) Survey of representative nineteenth century American novels, with emphasis on works of Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, and Dreiser.
  • ENG-L 357 Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3 cr.) American poetry since 1900, including such poets as Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Lowell.
  • ENG-L 358 Twentieth-Century American Fiction (3 cr.) American fiction since 1900, including such writers as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Bellow.
  • ENG-L 366 Modern Drama: English, Irish, American, and Post-Colonial (3 cr.) Shaw, Synge, O’Neill, and other significant dramatists, such as Harold Pinter, Edward Albee, August Wilson, Athol Fugard, and Wole Soyinka.
  • ENG-L 369 Studies in British and American Authors (3 cr.) Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and Melville), groups of authors (such as minority writers), and periods (such as American writers of the 1920s). Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 371 Critical Practices (3 cr.) P: ENG-L 202. Study of and practice in critical methodologies; can be focused on specific topics; may be repeated once for credit by departmental permission.
  • ENG-L 378 Studies in Women and Literature (3 cr.) British and American authors such as George Eliot, Gertrude Stein; groups of authors such as the Brontë sisters, recent women poets; or genres and modes such as autobiography, film, and criticism. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 379 American Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr.) A survey of representative authors and of works of American ethnic and minority literature, with a primary focus on African-American, Hispanic, and American-Indian literature.
  • ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalist, para-journalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers; several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 383 Studies in British or Commonwealth Culture (3 cr.) Study of a coherent period of British or Commonwealth culture (such as medieval, Elizabethan, or Victorian England, or modern Canada), with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual milieu.
  • ENG-L 388 Studies in Irish Literature and Culture (3 cr.) An intensive classroom and on-site study of Irish culture and the literature it has produced.
  • ENG-L 390 Children's Literature (3 cr.) Historical and modern children’s books and selections from books. Designed to assist future teachers, parents, or others in selecting the best in children’s literature for each period of the child’s life.
  • ENG-L 391 Literature for Young Adults (3 cr.) Study of books suitable for junior high and high school youths. Special stress on works of fiction dealing with contemporary problems; but also including modern classics, biography, science fiction, and other areas of interest to young adults.
  • ENG-L 395 British and American Film Stds (3 cr.) Intensive study of specific topics related to film narratives; emphasis on American or British film as a cultural phenomenon. Topic varies.
  • ENG-L 406 Topics in African-American Literature (3 cr.) Focuses on a particular genre, time, and period. Topics may include 20th-century African- American women's novels, black male identity in African-American literature, or African-American autobiography. May be repeated once for credit with different focus.
  • ENG-L 431 Topics in Literary Study (3 cr.) Studies in individual authors, groups of authors, movements, themes, modes, or genres. Topic varies.
  • ENG-L 433 Conversations with Shakespeare (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary and intertextual study of Shakespeare’s work and its influence to the present day. Students will compare Shakespeare texts with latter day novels, plays, poems, and films that allude to or incorporate some aspect of Shakespeare's art.
  • ENG-L 450 Seminar: British and American Authors (3 cr.) Intensive study of a major author or a school, or closely-related authors.
  • ENG-L 460 Seminar: Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.) Study of texts written in several historical periods united by a common mode or form (narrative, romanticism, lyric, etc.), or by a common theme (Bildungsroman, the city and the country, the two cultures question, the uses of literacy, etc.).
  • ENG-L 495 Individual Reading in English (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor and department chair. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 498 Internship in English (0-3 cr.) P. Major standing, minimum GPA of 3.0, 12 credit hours in English at 200 level or above (including ENG-L 202), prior arrangement with faculty member or editor. Supervised experience in various English department positions, in editing, or in approved work setting. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6 credit hours; only 3 credit hours may count toward the major.
  • ENG-W 105 Composition Lab (0-1 cr.) A composition lab in which students will practice writing skills taught in ENG-W 131.
  • ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, Inquiry 1 (3 cr.) Offers instruction and practice in the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills required in college. Emphasis is on written assignments that require summary, synthesis, analysis, and argument.
  • ENG-W 132 Elementary Composition II (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Continuation of ENG-W 131, with emphasis on writing from secondary sources: research, evaluation of evidence, and documentation. Introduces both MLA and APA documentation styles.
  • ENG-W 202 English Grammar Review (1 cr.) Provides basic understanding of grammatical terms and principles sufficient to enable students to edit their own prose with confidence. No prior knowledge of grammar is assumed or required.
  • ENG-W 203 Creative Writing (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing and consent of the instructor in advance of registration. Exploratory course in imaginative writing: fiction, poetry, and drama.
  • ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life (3 cr.) This multidisciplinary survey course explores the intersections between different conceptions of literacy (i.e., cultural, political, technological) and the significant, formative narratives of American public life both past and present. Past topics include "The American Dream: A Multidisciplinary Journey from Jay Gatsby to Jay-Z." 
  • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. This course helps students in any field develop writing skills appropriate for situations and tasks encountered in workplace and organizational settings. Course assignments and activities emphasize the role of professional writing and the importance of developing professional writing skills, emphasizing documents done in the world of work, such as letters, memos, reports, proposals, etc. Credit will not be given for both ENG-W 231 and ENG-W 321.
  • ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Writing workshop. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
  • ENG-W 311 Creative Nonfiction (3 cr.) P: completion of 100-level writing requirements. Study and practice of the essay utilizing creative writing techniques. Genres such as memoir, personal essay, nature essay, segmented essay, critical essay, and literary journalism will be studied.
  • ENG-W 321 Advanced Technical Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Instruction in preparing engineering and other technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics. Credit will not be given for both ENG-W 231 and ENG-W 321.
  • ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 231 or consent of instructor. Emphasizes principles of business writing, such as audience analysis and adaptation, design and readability of written documents, stylistic analysis and control, persuasion, communicating negative news, and the ethics of communication. The course focuses on writing documents, such as challenging business letters and memos, proposals, and performance appraisals.
  • ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.) P: Completion of English composition requirement. Close examination of assumptions, choices, and techniques that go into a student’s own writing and into the writing of others.
  • ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Students examine the workplace roles of editors while developing their own editing skills. Topics include editorial practices, style, grammar, ethics, and resources for editing.
  • ENG-W 368 Research Materials and Methods (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Introduction to information sources and research methods in English studies, textual studies, and digital humanities. Explores databases, concordances, bibliographies, archives, electronic text editing, text encoding and analysis, and other online and library sources. Emphasis on locating, analyzing, and evaluating relevant and credible sources as the basis for effective research.
  • ENG-W 395 Individual Study of Writing (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Exercise in the study of written expression and communication in informative, persuasive, or imaginative writing. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (0-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Internship in the Writing Center, designated IU Kokomo offices, or other arranged settings. Focus on writing, the teaching of writing, and writing-related tasks. Apply during semester prior to desired internship.
  • ENG-W 400 Issues in Teaching Writing (3 cr.) Focuses on the content of rhetoric and composition and considers fundamental theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of writing. Reviews rhetorical and compositional principles that influence writing instruction, textbook selection, and curriculum development.
  • ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.) Individualized project assigned by instructor consenting to direct it. Individual critical projects worked out with director. Credit varies with scope of project.
  • FINA-A 101 Ancient and Medieval Art (3 cr.) A survey of major styles and monuments in art and architecture from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages.
  • FINA-A 102 Renaissance Through Modern Art (3 cr.) A survey of major artists, styles, and movements in European and American art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present.
  • FINA-A 200 Topics in Art History (3 cr.) Various topics in the history of art will be offered depending upon instructors and their area of expertise. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • FINA-A 262 Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture (3 cr.) A historical survey of Japanese art in the context of culture, society, and politics; the arts of traditional Buddhism; ink painting and other arts associated with the Zen sect; the created landscape, in painting and garden design; historical narratives and scenes of ordinary life; and decorative and useful things, e.g., ceramics, lacquer, textiles, and “golden screens.”
  • FINA-A 280 Art of the Comics (3 cr.) Analysis of the visual and narrative language of comics from the earliest newspaper strips to the graphic novels of today.
  • FINA-A 333 From Van Eyck to Vermeer (3 cr.) Survey of major artists and themes in Netherlandish painting from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century.
  • FINA-A 340 Topics in Modern Art (3 cr.) Special topics in the history and study of nineteenth and twentieth-century European and American art. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credits.
  • FINA-A 449 Contemporary Art 1925-present (3 cr.) A study of contemporary art from 1925-preset.
  • FOLK-F 101 Introduction to Folklore (3 cr.) A view of the main forms and varieties of folklore and folk expression in tales, ballads, myth, legends, beliefs, games, proverbs, riddles, and traditional arts and crafts. The role of folklore in human society.
  • FREN-F 111 Elementary French I (4 cr.) Drills for mastery of reading, phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. Includes elements of French culture.
  • FREN-F 112 Elementary French II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 111 or equivalent. Continuation of FREN-F 111. Drills for mastery of reading, phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. Includes elements of French culture.
  • FREN-F 203 Second Year French I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 112 or equivalent. Composition, conversation, and grammar coordinated with the study of expository and literary texts.
  • FREN-F 204 Second Year French II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 203 or equivalent. Continuation of FREN-F 203. Composition, conversation, and grammar coordinated with the study of expository and literary texts.
  • FREN-F 260 French Lit & Civilization (3 cr.) Readings of representative literature from period chosen, their political, social and philosophical background, and parallel trends in the arts and music. Lectures in English. Readings in English.
  • GEOG-G 107 Physical Systems of the Environment (3 cr.) Physical environment as the home of humans, emphasizing the distribution and interaction of environmental variables (landforms, vegetation, soils, and climate). Note: Business majors may count GEOG-G 107 only as a social science.
  • GEOG-G 250 Computing in the geospatial sciences (3 cr.) A first course in scientific computing that emphasizes practical applications in the geospatial and environmental sciences. Requires high-level programming using MATLAB for visualization, data analysis, and modeling. Teaches problem solving through analysis and interpretation of a wide range of environmental and geographic data. 
  • GEOG-G 315 Environmental Concervation (3 cr.) Conservation of natural resources including soil, water, wildlife, and forests as interrelated components of the environment, emphasizing an ecological approach. Current problems relating to environmental quality.  
  • GEOL-G 100 General Geology (5 cr.) Broad study of the earth. The earth in the solar system, earth’s atmosphere. Formation and modification of earth materials, landforms, continents and oceans through geologic time.*
  • GEOL-G 133 Geology of the United States (5 cr.) Introduction to physical and historical geology with applications to United States geology. Study of the geologic events (and their associated rocks and structures) that have shaped the continent, including mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, intercontinental seaways, sedimentary environments, glacial geology and modern processes.*
  • GEOL-G 300 Environmental and Urban Geology (3 cr.) Significance of regional and local geologic features and processes in land use. Use of geologic factors to reduce conflict in utilization of mineral and water resources and damage from geologic hazards.
  • GEOL-G 400 Energy: Sources and Needs (3 cr.) Renewable and non-renewable energy resources, their origins, society’s needs and usage, environmental impacts of use and production, and future directions in energy technologies. Also may include study of non-energy resources including metallic and nonmetallic resources.
  • GEOL-G 421 United States Geology: Field Experience 1 (5 cr.) A six week lecture/field trip course incorporating a 2-3 week field experience in the western United States. Students will explore the geologic events (and their associated rocks and structures) that have shaped the continent, including mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, intercontinental seaways, sedimentary environments and glacial geology. Possible destinations include (but are not limited to) the Black Hills, Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Mt. Rainier, Mt. St. Helens and the Glacier National Park.*
  • GEOL-G 440 Professional Practice in Geosciences (1-6 cr.) The course is designed to provide opportunities for students to receive credit for career-related, full-time work.  
  • GEOL-T 312 Geology of Indiana (3 cr.) Study of the physiography and bedrock structure of Indiana, first with topographic and geologic maps, and then with field trips to selected areas. Rock and fossil specimens will be collected for study.  
  • GER-G 111 Elementary German I (4 cr.) Intensive introduction to present-day German with drills for mastery of reading, phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.
  • GER-G 112 Elementary German II (4 cr.) P: GER-G 111 or equivalent. Continuation of GER-G 111. Intensive introduction to present-day German with drills for mastery of reading, phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.
  • GER-G 203 Second Year German I (3 cr.) P:GER-G 112 or equivalent. Intensive review of important structural problems and vocabulary primarily through the reading and discussion of modern German fiction and nonfiction.
  • GER-G 204 Second Year German II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 203 or equivalent. Continuation of GER-G 203 Intensive review of important structural problems and vocabulary primarily through the reading and discussion of modern German fiction and nonfiction.
  • GER-G 306 Introduction to German Literature (3 cr.) P: GER-G 204 or equivalent. Study of a single literary theme (such as music, generational conflict, love, revolution) as represented in two or more periods. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G 363 Introduction to German Cultural History (3 cr.) P: GER-G 204 or equivalent. A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, with reference to its social, economic, and political context.
  • HIST-A 307 United States Cultural History (3 cr.) R: HIST-H 106 or completion of 56 credit hours. Course considers cultural transformations in modern United States history, including such topics as gender, ethnicity, social reform, and popular culture. 
  • HIST-A 315 United States Since World War Two (3 cr.) R: HIST-H 106 or completion of 56 credit hours. Alternate years. Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformations. 1945-present: the cold war, problems of contemporary America.
  • HIST-A 333 History of Indiana I (3 cr.) I: The course deals with the development of a midwestern state, with emphasis on the French and British periods; the West in the American Revolution; the transition from territory to state; political, economic, and cultural patterns; and the sectional crisis.
  • HIST-A 334 History of Indiana II (3 cr.) The period since 1865, tracing the development of a modern industrial commonwealth—agriculture, industry, politics, society, education, and the arts.
  • HIST-A 375 Crime and Punishment in American History (3 cr.) R: HIST-H 106 or completion of 56 credit hours. Alternate years. This course focuses on the history of crime and punishment in the 20th-century United States.
  • HIST-A 382 The Sixties (3 cr.) R: HIST-H 106 or completion of 56 credit hours. Alternate years. This course focuses on the history of the United States during the 1960s and the political change and dissent; rights movements; United States foreign policy and the conflict in Vietnam; gender, exploitation, and legal change that occurred. It addresses a variety of topics, including; and the increasing diversity of expression in social values and cultural practices.
  • HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.) Economic, social, political, and military-diplomatic developments, 1900 to present. I: 1900-1930: origins, impact, and consequences of World War I; peacemaking; postwar problems; international communism and fascism; the Great Depression.
  • HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II (3 cr.) 1930-present: Depression politics; crisis of democracy; German national socialism; World War II; Cold War; postwar reconstruction and recovery.
  • HIST-D 410 Russian Revolutions and Soviet Regime (3 cr.) Alternate years. Causes and development of Russian revolutions and civil war; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin; purges, terror, economic development, society, and arts under Stalin; struggle against Hitler; scope and limits of de-Stalinization under Khrushchev; minorities; dissent, and life in the former Soviet Union today.
  • HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.) Every semester. I: colonial period, revolution, confederation and constitution, national period to 1865.
  • HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.) Every semester. 1865 to present. Evolution of American society: political, economic, social structure; racial and ethnic groups; sex roles; Indian, inter- American, and world diplomacy of United States; evolution of ideology, war, territorial expansion, industrialization, urbanization, international events and their impact on American history.
  • HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) Every semester. I: Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval church; feudalism; and national monarchies.
  • HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) Every semester. Rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions, liberalism, political democracy; industrial revolution, capitalism, and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, international rivalries, and world wars.
  • HIST-H 405 Global History of Modern Sport (3 cr.) Alternate Years. Origins and development of sport in the modern world. From British public schools and ideals of fair play, through the Olympic movement, international soccer, holliganism and fandom, sport's role in identity creation and nationalism, and mass culture.
  • HIST-H 421 Topics: Asia, Africa, Latin America (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and/or problems in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • HIST-H 425 Topics in History (1-3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary; but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit.
  • HIST-H 495 Individual Readings in History (arr. cr.) Every semester (undergraduate). P: consent of instructor.
  • HIST-H 496 Internship in History (arr. cr.) Every semester (undergraduate). P: consent of instructor.
  • HIST-J 495 Senior Seminar for History Majors (3 cr.) Alternate years, Spring Semester. Senior Seminar for History/Political Science majors. P: consent of instructor.
  • HPER-E 100 Experiences in Physical Activity (1 cr.) Instruction in a specified physical education activity that is not regularly offered by the Department of Kinesiology. Emphasis on development of skill and knowledge pertinent to the activity. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • HPER-E 102 Group Exercise (1 cr.) A total fitness class that emphasizes cardiorespiratory conditioning, flexibility, muscular endurance. A variety of activities will be featured utilizing such equipment as steps, weights, resistance bands and music. S/F grades given. Repeatable once for credit.
  • HPER-E 111 Basketball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental skills of shooting, passing, ball handling, footwork, basic strategies of offensive and defensive play, and interpretation of rules.
  • HPER-E 115 Body Dynamics (1 cr.) Uses aerobic exercises to improve cardiovascular and respiratory conditioning.
  • HPER-E 117 Bowling (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the fundamentals of approach, release, arm swing, methods of scoring, rules, and etiquette on the lanes. Explanation of lane construction, lane condition, and automatic machines. Fee charged.
  • HPER-E 119 Personal Fitness (2 cr.) Instruction in basic principles of conditioning and fitness. Emphasis on muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance. For students without prior knowledge of conditioning methods.
  • HPER-E 121 Conditioning and Weight Training (1 cr.) Instruction in basic principles of conditioning and weight training. Emphasis on muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance.
  • HPER-E 133 Fitness and Jogging (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the basic principles of fitness as they apply to a jogging program. Emphasis on cardiorespiratory endurance and flexibility. Basic concepts underlying Dr. Kenneth Cooper's aerobic program. For students without prior experience in jogging programs, aerobics levels I through III. Only S/F grades given.
  • HPER-E 162 Tai Chi (1 cr.) Fitness class that emphasizes coordination and balance through the practice of Tai Chi.  Introduction to Sun style Tai Chi.  Course provides instruction to Dr. Paul Lam's Tai Chi I and II.  Emphasis will be on the movements and forms.
  • HPER-E 185 Volleyball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental skills of power volleyball, including the overhand serve, bump, set, dig, and spike. Team offensive and defensive strategies.
  • HPER-E 187 Weight Training (1 cr.) Instruction in basic principles and techniques of conditioning through use of free weights. Emphasis on personalized conditioning programs. Only S/F grades given.
  • HPER-E 190 Yoga (1 cr.) Instruction in basic principles and techniques of yoga. Emphasis on personalized training.
  • HPER-E 219 Weight Control and Exercise (1 cr.) Instructional program of weight control and exercise plan to maintain and health weight through nutrition and fitness. 
  • HPER-E 275 Aquatic Conditioning (1 cr.) Acquire a moderate to high level of aerobic capacity while using water, equipment and other useful techniques skills and ideas. Achieve students’ desired goal through fitness utilizing the water.
  • HPER-F 340 Physical Fitness Appraisal and Performance (3 cr.) A study of the basic scientific components of fitness and the measurement of different indices of physical fitness common to corporate, clinical, and laboratory settings. In particular, this course focuses on 5 characteristics of fitness: muscle strength, muscle endurance, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and body composition. The course will include weekly lectures and weekly laboratory sessions so students can implement their knowledge in a practical setting.
  • HPER-H 315 Consumer Health (3 cr.) This course is an overview or survey course of health products and services.  The health system is large and complex.  Therefore, the consumer needs to exercise proper discretion in selecting and properly utilizing the myriad of medical goods and services based upon personal values and decision-making skills. This course will also explore consumer issues related to proper selection of food and nutritional productions comparing different food labeling and costs.  Chronic Diseases in America are discussed from a consumer health approach.  (Cross-list with AHLT- H383) 
  • HPER-H 191 Food Service Sanitation (3 cr.) The application of sanitary and public health engineering principles to food services and lodging operations. 
  • HPER-H 310 Event Catering Management (3 cr.) Exploration of off premise and on premise catering requirement. Concept of event food management including menu planning, budget preparation, logistics management, guest relations and marketing.
  • HPER-H 315 Consumer Health (3 cr.) This course is an overview or survey course of health products and services.  The health system is large and complex.  Therefore, the consumer needs to exercise proper discretion in selecting and properly utilizing the myriad of medical goods and services based upon personal values and decision-making skills. This course will also explore consumer issues related to proper selection of food and nutritional productions comparing different food labeling and costs.  Chronic Diseases in America are discussed from a consumer health approach.  (Cross-list with AHLT- H383); (P. 30 + credit hours). 
  • HPER-H 317 Topical Seminar in Health Education (1-3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of health education.  (P. 30 + credit hours)
  • HPER-H 363 Personal Health (3 cr.) This survey course provides a theoretical and practical treatment of the concepts of disease prevention and health promotions.  Covers such topics as emotional health, aging, death, alcohol, tobacco, drug abuse, physical fitness, nutrition and dieting; consumer health chronic and communicable disease; safety and environmental health. 
  • HPER-L 310 Event Catering Management Lab (1 cr.) Students will apply their knowledge of food and catering to execute and evaluate catered events.  P. HPER-H 191 and or HPER-H 310.
  • HPER-N 220 Nutrition for Health (3 cr.) Introduction to nutrients, their uses, and food sources.  Application of nutrition principles to personal eating habits for general health; overview of current issues in nutrition.
  • HPER-P 120 Introduction to Health and Fitness (3 cr.) This course is part of the freshmen learning experience for Allied Health Sciences and Nursing.  For this course, students will engage in a variety of topics that relate to personal health and fitness.  It is important that students understand the consequences of their and fitness decisions in order to make informed decisions.  Thus, topics in this course will include nutrition, substances, stress management, the five components of fitness and self-assessments.  As this is a freshman learning course it will also offer students the opportunity to create relationships with other freshmen students who plan to pursue careers in health, nutrition and exercise (sport) related professions. 
  • HPER-P 204 Motor Development (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with a foundation of knowledge that will help them to understand motor development across the lifespan. Specifically, the course content will focus on theories of development, milestones, progressions, and influences on development.  (P. 18 + credit hours) 
  • HPER-P 211 Introduction to Sport Management (3 cr.) An examination of the broad spectrum of career opportunities available in the sport management profession. Special emphasis on career planning, sport management terminology, and an overview of specific skills and courses required for professional preparation in sport management.
  • HPER-P 212 Introduction to Exercise Science (3 cr.) This course is a survey of the discipline of kinesiology, including knowledge derived from performing physical activity, studying about physical activity, and professional practice centered in physical activity. It includes an analysis of the importance of physical activity in daily life, the relationship between physical activity and the discipline of kinesiology, and the general effects of physical activity experiences. The course surveys the general knowledge base of the discipline as reflected in the major sub-disciplines and reviews selected concepts in each, showing how they contribute to our understanding of the nature and importance of physical activity. In addition, the course introduces students to the general characteristics of the professions, to specific types of physical activity professions typically pursued by those graduating from programs of sport and exercise sciences, and assists them in making some early career decisions.
  • HPER-P 280 Basic Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3 cr.) This course is designed for future athletic trainers, coaches, sports and fitness majors, and anyone else who plans on working with active individuals who may encounter injury while performing physical activities.  This course introduces the concepts and practical skills of athletic training, including the prevention, recognition, evaluation, and management of athletic injuries.
  • HPER-P 328 Issues in Intercollegiate Athletics (3 cr.) Examination of current issues in intercollegiate sport in America. This course presents the historical foundation of current issues and solutions, and examines current positions and arguments. (P 30 + hours of credits)
  • HPER-P 333 Sports in America (3 cr.) Study of the evolution of sport in the United States within the larger context of historical developments in society; women's sport experiences in relation to the development of sport; examination of sport as a reflection of American culture from the founding of the colonies to the present. (P 30 + hours of credits)
  • HPER-P 391 Biomechanics (3 cr.) A course designed to aid the student’s understanding of the muscular control of the body and the mechanics of body and implement control. This course is designed to develop a basic understanding of sport mechanics and an appreciation of how superior sport techniques are based on the use of developmentally appropriate scientific concepts and natural law. (P. HPER-P 212; ANAT-A 215)
  • HPER-P 397 Kinesiology (3 cr.) This course is intended to teach students the basic concepts of kinesiology, particularly related to human movement in sport and physical activity settings. Concepts include, but are not limited to, internal/external forces, plasticity, motor control, and adaptations to physical movements. This course will be beneficial for students interested in biomechanics, physical therapy, rehabilitation, and sport coaching. (P. 30+ credit hours) 
  • HPER-P 402 Ethics in Sport (3 cr.) (Required for minor in Coaching)  This course will help students develop their abilities to reason morally through an examination within competitive sports of ethical theories, moral values, intimidation, gamesmanship, and violence, eligibility, elimination, winning, commercialization, racial equity, performance-enhancing drugs, and technology. Students will develop a personal philosophy of sport and learn how to apply a principled decision-making process to issues in sport.  (P. 30 + credit hours) 
  • HPER-P 405 Introduction to Sports Psychology (3 cr.) The psychology of sport is the study of the interaction between psychological variables and performance in sport and physical activity. Because the multifaceted field continues to evolve, it assumes many of its theories and concepts from general, social, personality, and developmental psychology as well as exercise physiology, sport sociology, and motor learning. Thus, it is an interdisciplinary field of study in sport and exercise science rather than a sub-discipline of general psychology. This introductory course is ideal for students who wish to work with athletes in some capacity, pursue a career in physical education teaching and/or coaching, or plan on working with individuals in the health and fitness industry. (P 30 + credit hours) 
  • HPER-P 409 Basic Physiology of Exercise (3 cr.) A survey of human physiology parameters as related to physical exercise and work and the development of physiological fitness factors. Physiological foundations will be considered. . (P. HPER-P 212; ANAT-A 215; PHSL-P 215)
  • HPER-P 411 Legal Issues in Sport Settings (3 cr.) An introduction to legal principles involved in sport. Tort liability including intentional tort, negligence, and product liability. Covers constitutional law issues, particularly as they relate to athletic eligibility, athletes' rights, sex discrimination, and drug testing. Discussion of sport contracts. (P 30 + credit hours)
  • HPER-P 415 Sport Promotions and Public Relations (3 cr.) An introduction to the theories and techniques of sport promotions, public relations and fund raising. (P 30 + credit hours)
  • HPER-P 445 Special Topics in Kinesiology (3 cr.) The aim of this course is to explore the social psychological research and theories that facilitate understanding of personal excellence in sport.  The course introduces theoretical and empirical work on participation and acquisition of expertise in sport as well as methodological issues related to developmental research in sport.  Specific discussion will focus on developmental aspects and learning conditions that allow individuals to maintain participation and reach high levels of performance in sport. (P. HPER-P 212; HPER-P 204; ANAT-A 215; PHSL-P 215)
  • HPER-P 452 Motor Learning (3 cr.) Open to juniors and seniors only. An examination of factors that affect the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Topics include perception, psychomotor learning, practice methods, and theories of neuromuscular integration.  (P. HPER-P 212 and HPER-P 204)
  • HPER-P 490 Motor Development and Learning (3 cr.) Motor learning and development principles throughout the life span. Emphasis on observing and analyzing characteristic movement behavior, motor learning, and motor performance, with application to developmentally appropriate movement experiences. (P. HPER-P 212; HPER-P 204; ANAT-A 215; PHSL-P 215)
  • HPER-R 355 Outdoor Recreation Consortium (3 cr.) This experiential learning course is designed to convey both practical information and direct experience to students about components of outdoor recreation.  To accomplish this goal, students are taught practical skills at the Kokomo campus (e.g., basic survival, orienteering, fire-starting, etc.) and then they embark on a week-long camping trip at a state or national park (e.g. Great Smokey Mountain National Park or and Indiana State Park).  On the trip, students will set up a base camp followed by daily excursions. 
  • HPER-R 472 Youth Sport Management (3 cr.) Exploration and examination of youth sport history, philosophy, development stages of youth sport management and programming; current issues and events necessary to deliver youth sports programming within a variety of settings, agencies and organizations. 
  • HPER-S 101 Introduction to Safety (3 cr.) Provides an overview of the variety of careers available in the safety profession. Examines the broad areas practiced by safety professionals, including regulatory compliance, environmental protection, ergonomics, industrial hygiene, emergency management, recreational safety, personal safety, healthcare, training and instruction, system safety, fire protection, and hazardous materials management.
  • HPER-S 151 Legal Aspects of Safety (3 cr.) Discuss legal requirements for safety, health and environmental compliance.  Emphasis is given to OSHA, EPA, FDA consensus standards, as well as other applicable Federal and State regulations. 
  • HPER-S 320 Economics of Sport (3 cr.) A study of contemporary sports using an economic approach. Issues include the wages of professional athletes, the impact of competitive balance on team profits, the alleged exploitation of student-athletes and the pricing of television rights are subjected to economic analysis.  Public policy issues such as antitrust legislation and public financing of arenas and stadiums are also examined.  (P. 30 + credit hours) 
  • HSS-E 103 Topics in Arts and Humanities (3 cr.) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of E 103 will meet the objectives of the HSS TOPICS curriculum. The curriculum is open to freshmen who will learn how scholars from the arts and humanities distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and communication skills are integrated in the course.
  • HSS-E 104 Topics in Social and Historical Studies (3 cr.) Specific topics will vary by section and over time, but all versions of E 104 will meet the objectives of the HSS TOPICS curriculum. The curriculum is open to freshmen and sophomores, who will learn how scholars from the social and historical studies distribution area frame questions, propose answers, and assess the validity of competing approaches. Writing and communication skills are integrated in the course.
  • HSS-I 100 Intro to International Studies (3 cr.) This introductory, interdisciplinary course is required for all students in the International Studies Program.  It will expose students to various academic and disciplinary approaches (representing the social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences) essential to international studies.  Students will analyze critical global issues and gain a fuller understanding of the international system.
  • HSS-S 200 Introduction to Leadership Studies (3 cr.) This course provides an overview of leadership theories and practices. It is offered in the hybrid format, meeting once per week on campus and once per week online.
  • HSS-S 300 Leadership Practicum - Leadership in Action (1-2 cr.) This course provides hands-on experiences with leadership activities and events that provide a leadership opportunity. Students will take this class for three credits--either as three one-credit modules or as a one credit/two credit sequence.
  • HSS-S 400 Leadership Capstone (3 cr.) This course is an applied, experiential learning course where students can practice the knowledge gained in other courses. It serves as a capstone for the minor and students will complete a semester-ling project
  • HTM-T 100 Introduction to Tourism Studies (3 cr.) Travel, trends, travel-modes, and economic impact on destination area.  Emphasis on local, regional, and national tourism.
  • HTM-T 171 Introduction to Convention/Meeting Management (3 cr.) An overview of the conventions, expositions and meetings industry.  Focus will be on the operational aspects of various industry segments and the intra-industry of each.
  • HTM-T 181 Lodging Industry Operations (3 cr.) Concepts of organization, communication, ethics and policy formulation in the front office.  Introducing the basic techniques and trends in systems and equipment available to meet the needs of the management and the guest.
  • HTM-T 191 Sanitation and Health in Food Service, Lodging and Tourism (3 cr.) The application of sanitary and public health engineering principles to food service and lodging operations.
  • HTM-T 210 Special Event Management (3 cr.) Course topics include planning for social events such as themed parties, weddings, balls, fundraiser recognition and entertainment events.
  • HTM-T 218 Wines of the World (3 cr.) An examination of wines produced in other countries, identifying the characteristics of the growing regions, types of wines produced, economic considerations of purchasing imported wines and marketing these wines to increase beverage sales.
  • HTM-T 219 Management of Sports Events (3 cr.) Amateur or professional sport event planning will include discussion of site selection, logistics, personnel, marketing, economics, and legalities of hosting an event.
  • HTM-T 271 Mechanics of Meeting Planning (3 cr.) An analysis of details pertinent to the organization and execution of a meeting. Topics include finances and contracts, site selection, program development, marketing, evaluation and wrap-up.
  • HTM-T 306 Destination Planning (3 cr.) To prepare a business plan that presents a comprehensive outline of a proposed hospitality operation and includes a financial portfolio and work history of the applicant.
  • HTM-T 310 Event Catering Management (3 cr.) Exploration of off and on premise catering requirement. Concept of event food management including menu planning, budget preparation, logistics management, guest relations and marketing.
  • HTM-T 325 Food and Beverage Management (3 cr.) This course will educate students on the standards required for food and beverage operations.  They will learn how to effectively manage food and beverage controls, operating budgets, health and safety in food preparation, menu management and pricing, purchasing and supplier selection, and service quality standardization.
  • HTM-T 328 Introduction to Microbrewing (3 cr.) This course deals with the principles of microbrewing, and each student will learn the basic concepts necessary to create beer. In this sense, students should come away from this class with the knowledge to build his or her own microbrewery. As well, this class teaches a general appreciation for brewing and beers around the world.
  • HTM-T 334 Cultural Heritage Tourism (3 cr.) Cultural and heritage tourism balances visitor interests and needs against protecting cultural and heritage resources. This course examines the range of cultural and heritage assets that can become viable tourism attractions and looks at ways of linking quality cultural heritage tourism to community development. Special emphasis will be placed on Indiana cultural and heritage tourism.
  • HTM-T 351 Tourism Experiences (3 cr.) This course aims to evaluate tourism experiences from an interdisciplinary perspective, including the role of humans, nature/landscapes, built environments and technologies in staging tourism-experiences.  Elements include analysis and evaluation of tourism experiences involving hospitality, resorts, cultural/heritage locations, urban destinations and events.  The class will include techniques for managing quality tourism experiences and the developing new tourism experience for a tourism location.
  • HTM-T 355 Interpretation and Tour Guiding for Destinations (3 cr.) This course explores the communication processes and practices between resource managers and visitors at tourism locations including natural, cultural, historic and learning resource sites.  This course includes principles and techniques of gathering, analyzing and disseminating information through various media, such as exhibits, presentations, publications and programs at museums, natural and cultural centers, and other tourism attractions.
  • HTM-T 362 Economics of Tourism (3 cr.) To discuss the economic impact of travel on tourism's various sectors, and the quantitative methods that can be applied to travel forecasting and tourism principles.
  • HTM-T t371 Special Event Management (3 cr.) Course topics include planning for social events such as themed parties, weddings, balls, fundraiser recognition and entertainment events.
  • HTM-T 375 International Tourism (3 cr.) This course will help students have a better understanding of tourism practices from a global perspective by appraising the impact of international tourism from a cultural, social and economic point of view.  This will involve examing the history, policy, and trends in the industry, research various aspects of the tourism industry, identifying potential careers, and acquiring workable use of terms, concepts, and principles.
  • HTM-T 385 Beer and Spirits Management (3 cr.) Students will be introduced to the basic principles of beer and spirits production with a primary focus on manufacturing quality criteria, beer and spirits styles, and sensory standards. Evaluation by tasting is an integral part of this course.
  • HTM-T 401 Tourism Internship (3 cr.) To provide students an opportunity to improve their operational/managerial skills by working in new areas.
  • HTM-T 419 Tourism Sports Marketing (3 cr.) This course will focus on marketing for diverse sports as it relates to tourism with an emphasis on intercollegiate athletics, professional sports, and multi-sport club operations.
  • HTM-T 425 Event Production (3 cr.) This course will help students gain an understanding of the production of events. The logistics and strategy behind quality events will be covered and students will have the opportunity to use scenarios to create their own signature event specifications.
  • HTM-T 444 Tourism Careers and Leadership (3 cr.) This course will cover topics that help students be prepared for a career in the tourism industry. Leadership and management techniques will be discussed and studied to help hone in skills that will be vital to tourism professionals and especially those with supervisory responsibilities.
  • HTM-T 475 Special Topics in Tourism (3 cr.) This course will cover special topics that are current issues or opportunities in the tourism industry. With the rapidly changing tourism environment due to economies, technology, and aging populations, there are some topics that will be timely to the current trends in tourism and will benefit our students to have an understanding of these topics prior to working in the industry full-time.
  • HUMA-U 102 Introduction to Modern Humanities: The Live Performances (3 cr.) This course examines the approach to attending live performances including opera, symphony, theatre, and dance. Topics include protocol and traditions of the audience, criteria for critical listening, and discrimination of basic elements of performance. Students will attend live performances, engage in discussions of performances by genre, and develop critical listening skills.
  • HUMA-U 103 Introduction to Creative Arts (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary course that brings together music, art, dance, theatre, cinema, and storytelling into a cohesive, comprehensive, and thematic study of the interrelationships of the fine arts.
  • INFO-C 100 Informatics Foundations (3 cr.) Introduction to informatics, basic problem solving and elementary programming skills. This course also provides a survey of computing tools in the context of selected disciplines (cognates).
  • INFO-C 112 TOOLS FOR INFORMATICS: PROGRAMMING AND DATABASES (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to programming and databases, two basic means of creating, changing, and storing information on a computer. Computational thinking, basic programming, and basic debugging methods will be covered in a high-level language. Data modeling, schemas, SQL queries, and data-entry forms will also be emphasized.
  • INFO-C 201 MATHEMATICAL FOUNDATIONS OF INFORMATICS (3 cr.) An introduction to methods of analytical, abstract, and critical thinking, deductive reasoning, and logical and mathematical tools used in information sciences. The topics include propositional and predicate logic, natural deduction proof system, sets, functions and relations, elementary statistics, proof methods in mathematics, and mathematical induction.
  • INFO-C 203 Social Informatics (3 cr.) Introduction to key ethical, privacy and legal issues as related to informatics, and social research perspectives and literatures on the use of information and communication technologies. Topics include: intellectual property, legal issues, societal laws, ethical use of information, information privacy laws, personal code of ethics, principles for resolving ethical conflicts, and popular and controversial uses of technology. This course also outlines research methodologies for social informatics.
  • INFO-C 210 Problem Solving and Programming (3 cr.) First in a two-course sequence of intensive computer programming. In this course, students will design, develop, test, and debug software solutions using a given programming language.
  • INFO-C 211 Problem Solving and Programming 2 (3 cr.) Second course in the two-course sequence of intensive computer programming. In this course, students will learn and apply object oriented computer programming concepts and techniques. The course will also provide a brief introduction to data structures and files.
  • INFO-C 300 Human Computer Interaction (3 cr.) This course will provide an introduction to the core topics, approaches and developments in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The course introduces the process involved in designing and evaluating interactive technologies. Topics include interaction design, evaluation, usability, user psychology, web design, prototyping, requirements and analysis, and other related issues.
  • INFO-C 307 Data Representation and Organization (3 cr.) This course will provide an introduction to ways in which data can be organized, represented and processed from low level to high level. Topics include construction of memory based structures and algorithms using arrays (single, multidimensional), lists (single, double, circular), stacks, queues, binary trees, and hash tables, and basic file manipulation.
  • INFO-C 399 Database Systems (3 cr.) This course will provide an in-depth discussion of database system fundamentals. The course emphasizes the concepts underlying various functionalities provided by a database management system, and its usage from an end-user perspective. Topics include: overview and architecture of database systems, relational database modeling and querying, and basic XML database modeling and querying.
  • INFO-C 413 Web Design and Development (3 cr.) This course introduces website design and development. Topics include client-side technologies such as Hypertext Markup Language (HTML, XML), the document object model (DOM), Cascading Style Sheet (CSS), JavaScript and jQuery, AJAX, front-end framework, and server-side technologies.
  • INFO-C 450 System Design (3 cr.) This course introduces the concepts of large scale system design and development. Topics include: the software development life cycle, specification, analysis, design, modeling, use cases, user interface design, planning, estimating, reusability, portability, working in teams, introductory project management and CASE tools. Student teams will present their final project design.
  • INFO-C 451 System Implementation (3 cr.) This course introduces the concepts of large scale system implementation. Topics include: implementation of data models, user interfaces, and software systems, working in teams, software testing, planning, estimating, and post-delivery maintenance. The students will work in teams and will utilize project management tools and revision control and source code management systems. Student teams will present their final project design.
  • INFO-C 452 Project Management (3 cr.) This course will provide an in-depth discussion of project management in an Informatics setting. Students will become conversant in the tools and techniques of project management, such as project selection methods, work breakdown structures, network diagrams, critical path analysis, critical chain scheduling, cost estimates, earned value management, motivation theory and team building.
  • INFO-I 100 First Year Experience (1 cr.) This course introduces specific survival skills for success in college and beyond, while reconciling personal learning skills with instructor-based teaching styles. Master the art of inquiry and elevate your sense of integrity while sharpening your personal edge by exploring critical thinking, project managements and current/future job market trends. 
  • INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.) Problem solving with information technology; introductions to information representation, relational databases, system design, propositional logic, cutting-edge technologies: CPU, operation systems, networks; laboratory emphasizing information technology including Web page design, word processing databases, using tools available on campus.  
  • INFO-I 105 Computer Concepts for Health Information (3 cr.) This course provides an overview of applications for the health and medical professionals.  Topics include:  audit trails, generating, quantifying and analyzing medical records, word processing, computer hardware, medical software, copyright and fair usage.  Students retrieve and present medical data.
  • INFO-I 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (4 cr.) An introduction to methods of analytical, abstract and critical thinking, deductive reasoning, and logical and mathematical tools used in information sciences. The topics include propositional and predicate logic, natural deduction proof system, sets, functions and relations, proof methods in mathematics, mathematical induction, and graph theory. Credit given for either INFO-I 201 or CSCI-C 250.
  • INFO-I 202 Social Informatics (3 cr.) Introduction to key social research perspectives and literatures on the use of information and communication technologies. Discusses current topics such as information ethics, relevant legal frameworks, popular and controversial uses of technology (e.g., peer-to-peer file sharing), digital divides, etc. Outlines research methodologies for social informatics.  
  • INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.) The software architecture of information systems. Basic concepts of systems and applications programming. Credit given for only one of the following: INFO-I 210, CSCI-C 101.
  • INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.) The systems architecture of distributed applications. Advanced programming techniques, including event-driven programming, elementary data structures, and entry-level mobile programming. Credit given for only one of the following: INFO-I 211, CSCI-C 201.
  • INFO-I 213 Web Site Design and Development (3 cr.) Introduction to web design and development covering high-level concepts in addition to hands-on activities. Topics include: internet infrastructure, client-side technologies, embedded media, page design, site design, accessibility and others. Technologies covered include: HTML5, Cascading Style Sheets, and Web authoring tools such as Dreamweaver.  This course runs concurrently with NMCM-N 213.
  • INFO-I 300 Human Computer Interaction (3 cr.) The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current Human Computer Interaction designs with an eye toward what future technologies will allow. The course will emphasize learning HCI based on implementation and testing interfaces.
  • INFO-I 303 Organizational Informatics (3 cr.) Examines the various needs, uses, and consequences of information in organizational contexts. Topics include organizational types and characteristics, functional areas and business processes, information-based products and services, the use of and redefining role of information technology, the changing character of work life and organizational practices, sociotechnical structures, and the rise and transformation of information-based industries.
  • INFO-I 308 Informatics Representation (3 cr.) The basic structure of information representation in digital information systems. Begins with low-level computer representations such as common character and numeric encodings. Introduces formal design and query languages through Entity Relationship Modeling, the Relational Model, XML, and XHTML. Laboratory topics include SQL and XPath querying.
  • INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology (3 cr.) The study of the evolution of media arts and underlying principles of communication.  Application development paradigms in current practice.
  • INFO-I 356 Globalization: Where we fit in (3 cr.) Globalization, increasingly enabled by information technology, changes how we work, what we buy and who we know. Learn about the past, present, and future of globalization from an information technology perspective, and what it means for you, your career, and your community.
  • INFO-I 399 Current Topics in Informatics (1 - 3 cr.) Emphasis is on new developments and research in informatics.  For example, issues such as bioinformatics and medical informatics will be explored.
  • INFO-I 400 Topics in Informatics (1 - 3 cr.) Variable topic.  Emphasis on new developments and research in informatics.
  • INFO-I 450 Systems Design and Development (3 cr.) Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate), then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world-style environment.
  • INFO-I 451 Systems Development (3 cr.) Continuation of INFO-I 450. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate), then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world-style environment.
  • INFO-I 490 Internship in Informatics Professional Practice (1-3 cr.) Students gain professional work experience in an industry or research organization setting using skills and knowledge acquired in informatics course work. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 cr. hours. S/F grading.
  • JOUR-C 200 Introduction to Mass Communications (3 cr.) Survey of functions, responsibilities, and influence of various mass communications media. Directed toward the consumer and critic of mass media in modern society.
  • JOUR-J 200 Reporting, Writing, & Editing I (3 cr.) Working seminar stressing the creation of journalistic stories for diverse audiences. Students will learn to develop story ideas, gather information, combine visual and verbal messages, and to write and edit news.
  • JOUR-J 201 Reporting, Writing, & Editing II (3 cr.) Working seminar focused on the strengthening of basic journalism skills, including in-depth reporting, editing, and multimedia presentations. Creativity, cooperation and critical thinking are used to shape effective messages for diverse audiences.
  • JOUR-J 343 Broadcast News (3 cr.) Techniques of gathering, analyzing, and writing news and features for broadcast. Practice in interviewing, observation, and use of documentary references that include computer information retrieval and analysis skills.
  • JOUR-J 344 Photojournalism Reporting (3 cr.) This is an intermediate photojournalism course focusing on the basics of light, camera operation, and the use of the digital darkroom. It includes instruction in spot news and feature photography as well as instruction in ethics, privacy, and law.
  • MA 15400 Algebra and Trigonometry II (3 cr.) Spring. Trigonometry for students with inadequate preparation for calculus. This is the second half of a two-semester version of MA 15100. Not open to students with credit for MA 15100.  
  • MA 16010 Calculus for Technology I (3 cr.) MA 22100 Calculus for Technology I (3 cr).  Spring.  Not open to students with credit in MATH-M 119.  First course in techniques of calculus for students enrolled in certain technical curricula.
  • MA 16020 Calculus for Technology II (3 cr.) Spring.   Not open to students with credit in MA 22400 or MATH-M 120. Continuation of MA 16010.  Knowledge of trigonometry required.
  • MA 15300 Algebra and Trigonometry I (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Algebra for students with inadequate preparation for calculus. This is the first half of a two-semester version of MA 15100. Not open to students with credit for MA 15100.
  • MATH-K 310 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measurement of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods. Credit given for only one of the following: PSY-K 300, ECON-E 270, MATH-K 310 or STAT 30100.
  • MATH-M 104 Foundations of College Algebra (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Students will develop critical problem solving skills, acquire an understanding of the core concept of functions and learn appropriate technology skills while strengthening their mastery of linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, polynomial operations and graphing techniques for linear equations.
  • MATH-M 105 College Algebra (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Students will deepen their understanding of functions, acquire non-linear problem solving skills and develop the algebraic skills necessary for precalculus and general education mathematics courses: factoring; quadratic, polynomial, rational and radical equations and applications; and operations with rational expressions, radicals, and rational exponents.
  • MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) Fall, Spring.  Set theory, linear systems, matrices and determinants, probability, linear programming. Applications to problems from business and the social sciences.  
  • MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus I (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students in the social sciences. Not open to those who have had MATH-M 211 or MATH-M 215. Credit not given for both MATH-M 215 and MATH-M 119.  
  • MATH-M 120 Brief Survey of Calculus II (3 cr.) Spring.  A continuation of MATH-M 119, covering topics in elementary differential equations, calculus of functions of several variables and infinite series. Intended for non-physical science students. Credit not given for both MATH-M 216 and MATH-M 120. Knowledge of trigonometry required.  
  • MATH-M 125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Designed to prepare students for calculus. Algebraic operations, polynomials, functions and their graphs, conic sections, linear systems of equations.
  • MATH-M 126 Trigonometric Functions (3 cr.) Spring. Designed to develop the properties of the trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions and to prepare for courses in calculus (MATH-M 211 or MATH-M 215).
  • MATH-M 133 Topics in Probability and Statistics (2 cr.) Topics in set theory, probability, descriptive statistics, binomial and normal distributions, and confidence intervals.
  • MATH-M 134 Topics in Mathematics (2 cr.) Variable topics in mathematics such as graph theory, logic, mathematics of personal finance, mathematics in music and art, modeling using regression, matrices and Markov chains, geometry, governmental mathematics, game theory and linear programming.
  • MATH-M 215 Calculus I (5 cr.) Fall, Spring. Coordinates, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, and  applications. A student cannot receive credit for more than one of  MATH-M 215, MATH-M 119, and MATH-M 211. 
  • MATH-M 303 Linear Algebra for Undergraduates (3 cr.) Introduction to theory of real and complex vector spaces. Coordinate systems, linear dependence, bases. Linear transformations and matrix calculus. Determinants and rank. Credit not given for both MATH-M 301 and MATH-M 303.  
  • MATH-M 311 Calculus III (4 cr.) Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; minimum and maximum problems; and multiple integration.  
  • MATH-M 313 Elementary Differential Equations with Applications (3 cr.) Ordinary differential equations of first order and linear equations of higher order with applications, series solutions, operational methods, Laplace transforms, and numerical techniques. A student may not receive credit for both MATH-M 313 and 343.
  • MATH-M 347 Discrete Mathematics (3 cr.) Injective and surjective functions; inverse functions; composition; reflexive, symmetric, and transitive relations; equivalence relations; sets including complements, products, and power sets; cardinality; introductory logic including truth tables and quantification; elementary techniques of proof including induction and recursion; counting techniques; graphs and trees; discrete probability.  
  • MATH-M 360 Elements of Probability (3 cr.) Introduction to mathematical theory of probability. Probability models, combinatorial problems, conditional probability and independence, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, repeated Bernoulli trials, gambler's ruin problems, moments, moment generating functions, law of large numbers, central limit theorem, and applications.
  • MATH-M 366 Elements of Statistical Inference (3 cr.) Sampling distributions (Chi square, t and F distributions), order statistical decisions, and inference. Hypothesis-testing concepts, Neyman-Pearson Lemma, likelihood ratio tests, power of tests. Point estimation, method of moments, maximum likelihood, Cramer-Rao bound, properties of estimators. Interval estimation, applications. Regression, correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods.  
  • MATH-M 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra I (3 cr.) Study of groups, rings, fields (usually including Galois theory), with applications to linear transformations.  
  • MATH-M 404 Introduction to Modern Algebra II (3 cr.) Study of groups, rings, fields extensions, with applications to linear transformations.
  • MATH-M 413 Introduction to Analysis I (3 cr.) Modern theory of real number system, limits, functions, sequences and series, Riemann-Stieltjes integral, and special topics.  
  • MATH-M 415 Elementary Complex Variables with Applications (3 cr.) Algebra and geometry of complex numbers, elementary functions of a complex variable, power series, integrations, calculus of residues, conformal mapping. Application to physics.  
  • MATH-M 447 Mathematical Models and Applications I (3 cr.) Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. Suitable for secondary school teachers.  
  • MATH-M 448 Mathematical Models and Applications II (3 cr.) Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth.
  • MATH-M 471 Numerical Analysis I (3 cr.) Interpolation and approximation of functions, numerical integration and differentiation, solution of nonlinear equations, acceleration and extrapolation, solution of systems of linear equations, eigenvalue problems, initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations, and computer programs applying these numerical methods.
  • MATH-M 216 Calculus II (5 cr.) Spring. Techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integrations, infinite series. A student cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH-M 216, MATH-M 120, and MATH-M 212.  
  • MATH-T 109 Mathematics for Elementary Education I (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Introduction to problem-solving, including use of patterns and Venn diagrams; study of various numeration systems; whole numbers, fraction, and decimal algorithms with manipulatives; ratio; percent; logic. Open only to elementary education majors. Does not count towards divisional distribution requirement.  
  • MATH-T 110 Mathematics for Elementary Education II (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Emphasis on geometry with use of manipulatives; study of plane figures and solids. Discussion of area, volume, symmetry, perimeter, tesselation, constructions with mira and compass, congruence, similarity, probability, statistics. Open only to elementary education majors. Does not count toward divisional distribution requirement. 
  • MATH-T 336 Topics in Euclidean Geometry (3 cr.) Axiom systems for the plane, the parallel postulate and non-Euclidean geometry, classical theorems. Geometric transformation theory, vectors and analytic geometry, convexity, theory of area and volume.
  • MATH-Y 398 Internship in Professional Practice (1 - 3 cr.) Internship with businesses requiring applied mathematics (or pure mathematics) projects.  
  • MICR-J 200 Microbiology and Immunology (3 cr.) Fall, Spring.  For students of the baccalaureate curricula in the School of Nursing and in the Division of Allied Health Sciences; others by consent of instructor. Concurrent or previous registration in MICR-J 201 Microbiology Laboratory is recommended. Basic principles of microbiology, cell biology and epidemiology. Consideration of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites in human disease; immunology and host-defense mechanisms.
  • MICR-J 201 Microbiology Laboratory (1 cr.) Fall, Spring. Bacteriological techniques of microscopy, asepsis, pure culture, and identification of unknown bacteria. Biology of microorganisms; action of antimicrobial agents and disinfectants, food microbiology and bacterial agglutination reactions.
  • MICR-M 310 Microbiology (3 cr.) Application of fundamental biological principles to the study of microorganisms. Significance of microorganisms to humans and their environment. Topics covered include bacterial growth and metabolism, microbial genetics, microbial diversity, mechanisms of pathogenicity, epidemiology and environmental microbiology.
  • MICR-M 315 Microbiology Laboratory (2 cr.) Laboratory exercises and demonstrations to yield proficiency in principles and techniques of cultivation and utilization of microorganisms under aseptic conditions. These principles will include microscopy, asepsis, pure culture, bacterial metabolism, genetic transformation and identification of unknown bacteria.
  • MICR-M 320 Environmental and Public Health Microbiology (3 cr.) Introduction to basic concepts in environmental microbiology and epidemiology.  Significance of waterborne pathogenic microorganisms and indicators.  Importance of drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment.  Introduction to foodborne pathogens and foodborne infections. 
  • MUS-M 174 Music for the Listener (3 cr.) How to listen to music, art of music and its materials, instrument and musical forms.
  • MUS-T 110 Rudiments of Music (3 cr.) Entry level class for students interested in how music works. The class deals with the fundamentals of notation, ear training, and music reading. Melody and harmony are explored.
  • MUS-U 110 Special Topics in Music (2 cr.) Various topics from semester to semester.
  • MUS-X 040 Instrumental Ensemble: Band (2 cr.) This course may be taken for up to 8 credit hours with different topics.
  • MUS-X 070 University Choral Ensemble (1 cr.)
  • MUS-Z 201 History of Rock 'n' Roll Music (3 cr.) A history and appreciation of rock’s classic era. The course begins with the 1964 British Invasion, which signaled the arrival of rock’s second generation. Examines the major musical figures and social issues (civil rights struggle, the war in Vietnam) of the 1960s.
  • MUS-Z 373 The American Musical: Context and Development (3 cr.) The origins of the American Musical: its societal impact and its development from vaudeville and European operetta to the rock musicals of today.
  • NMAT-D 207 Intro to Visual Communication (3 cr.) This course looks at the visual aspects of print and electronic communication. It deals with issues of page design, visuals and other graphics, from practical, historical, and theoretical perspectives. Students will produce visual designs, including flyers and brochures.*
  • NMAT-D 216 Studio in Digital Media I (3 cr.) Introductory work in the use of digital media tools, including video, animation, image manipulation, and digital illustration in the creation of art.*
  • NMAT-D 217 Typography I (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to the aesthetics, mechanics, history, terminology, specifications, and use of type in design. Typefaces will be evaluated and rendered in a variety of studio assignments using both hand written and computer techniques.
  • NMAT-D 257 Graphic Design I (3 cr.) Emphasis on visual communication through the perceptive use of line, form, and color. Elementary study of letter forms and typography. Introduction to basic tools, drawing disciplines of graphic design, and computer graphics.*
  • NMAT-D 277 Design Center: Introduction to Graphic Design Production and Practice (3 cr.) This course introduces and focuses on the interaction graphic designers have with clients & printers and gaining professional graphic design skills. D 277 and D 377 run concurrently, serving real client (non profit) needs, each semester. 
  • NMAT-D 316 Studio in Digital Media II (3 cr.) Intermediate work in the use of digital media tools, including video, animation, image manipulation, and digital illustration in the creation of art.*
  • NMAT-D 317 Typography II (3 cr.) This is an advanced course in type design. Typefaces will be created and evaluated in a variety of studio assignments using both hand written and computer techniques. In this course you will learn to produce work that is conceptual and/or practical, for physical and/or digital media. Exploration will be driven by a combination of larger studio/lab projects and a series of smaller lecture/demos. Projects and assignments will require reading, research, writing, design work and critique.*
  • NMAT-D 326 Digital Illustration I (3 cr.) Course explores basic development of digital illustrations for use in graphic design.*
  • NMAT-D 336 Sound in Context: Audio for Film, Video & Interaction (3 cr.) Sound in Context is a lecture/lab course designed to introduce students to concepts of music and sound for a variety of media with a primary focus on creating original audio and/or sound tracks. Topics include music structures, production and editing, film and video synchronization, game audio, sound art, and other related topics.
  • NMAT-D 357 Graphic Design II (3 cr.) Further studies exploring design principles. Students utilize both hand and digital methods to solve design problems creatively and effectively. Course includes typographic exploration.*
  • NMAT-D 367 Identity Design & Branding (3 cr.) Teaches how to create a visual identity that communicates the essential qualities desired by the particular business.*
  • NMAT-D 377 Design Center: Graphic Design Production & Practice (3 cr.) Graphic Design Production and Practice is a unique community outreach learning opportunity, providing design services to the greater Kokomo area. The students will work in a design studio environment, invest in their community and gain vast knowledge and experience. The aim here is to develop a strong portfolio that moves beyond consisting of solely hypothetical assignments into being a showcase of actual/published client based projects that a student developed from concept to actualization/production.*
  • NMAT-D 416 Advanced Digital Media Studio (3 cr.) This course will explore the creative use of the digital image in still and moving formats.  Emphasis will be on the possibilities provided by this advanced technology and the growing sets of delivery options available. Students will learn to think and adopt creative approaches to photography and cinematography/videography through a set of challenging class projects, exercises, demonstrations, and presentations.*
  • NMAT-D 426 Advanced Digital Illustration (3 cr.) Using the pre-requisite D 326 Introduction to Digital Illustration (formerly N 312) as a springboard, this course will encourage self expression and diversity while primarily focusing on illustrative work that is directly tied to Graphic Design based creative briefs. The aim here is to develop strong portfolio pieces.*
  • NMAT-D 467 Publication & Editorial Design (3 cr.) A publication and editorial design course that tackles multiple paged printed and bound documents, beginning with magazines and transitioning to focus upon the book format for the bulk of the course. It currently operates primarily within InDesign, while utilizing other software from the Adobe suite, such as Photoshop and Illustrator.*
  • NMAT-F 101 Core Foundations: Tier 1--Block 1 (3 cr.) Each block consists of three five week sections under umbrella topics taught by different NMAT faculty. The faculty rotate in order to expose the students to a wide range of experiences and creative approaches. The scope and flexibility of the topics establishes a solid foundation of traditional and digital skills a long with the critical thinking that is relevant to a contemporary practice in art and design.
  • NMAT-F 102 Core Foundations: Tier 1--Block 2 (3 cr.) Each block consists of three five week sections under umbrella topics taught by different NMAT faculty. The faculty rotate in order to expose the students to a wide range of experiences and creative approaches. The scope and flexibility of the topics establishes a solid foundation of traditional and digital skills a long with the critical thinking that is relevant to a contemporary practice in art and design.
  • NMAT-F 103 Core Foundations: Tier 1--Block 3 (3 cr.) Each block consists of three five week sections under umbrella topics taught by different NMAT faculty. The faculty rotate in order to expose the students to a wide range of experiences and creative approaches. The scope and flexibility of the topics establishes a solid foundation of traditional and digital skills a long with the critical thinking that is relevant to a contemporary practice in art and design.
  • NMAT-F 201 Core Foundations: Tier 2--Block 1 (3 cr.) Each block consists of three five week sections under umbrella topics taught by different NMAT faculty. The faculty rotate in order to expose the students to a wide range of experiences and creative approaches. The scope and flexibility of the topics establishes a solid foundation of traditional and digital skills a long with the critical thinking that is relevant to a contemporary practice in art and design.
  • NMAT-F 202 Core Foundations: Tier 2--Block 2 (3 cr.) Each block consists of three five week sections under umbrella topics taught by different NMAT faculty. The faculty rotate in order to expose the students to a wide range of experiences and creative approaches. The scope and flexibility of the topics establishes a solid foundation of traditional and digital skills a long with the critical thinking that is relevant to a contemporary practice in art and design.
  • NMAT-F 203 Core Foundations: Tier 2--Block 3 (3 cr.) Each block consists of three five week sections under umbrella topics taught by different NMAT faculty. The faculty rotate in order to expose the students to a wide range of experiences and creative approaches. The scope and flexibility of the topics establishes a solid foundation of traditional and digital skills a long with the critical thinking that is relevant to a contemporary practice in art and design.
  • NMAT-F 250 Connected Foundations (3 cr.) Connected Foudations is the capstone of the core foundations program. The course will help students synthesize the foundation learning to help build the momentum, awareness, and confidence for majors to excel in their junior and senior years. The course is one week long and involves experiences at a retreat center off campus.
  • NMAT-G 341 Independent Study In New Media, Art & Technology (1 cr.) In-depth projects and studies of special topics closely related to existing areas of concentration within New Media, Art & Technology.*
  • NMAT-G 398 Internship In New Media, Art & Technology (1 cr.) Internship focusing on producing and managing new media communication projects. Apply during semester prior to desired internship. Must represent a minimum of 40 hours of experience per credit hour.
  • NMAT-G 405 Concepts and Images (3 cr.) This advanced study course covers the understanding and use of critical theory in the contemporary world. Questions such as, in what ways does theory help in thinking and understanding the world. This course will explore, through the visual arts, contemporary critical theory and how we use it to be better thinkers, writers, students, and citizens of the world.*
  • NMAT-G 411 New Media Theory (3 cr.) This course examines various theories of new media communication and its effects on the world. Theories of design, criticism and computer-mediated communication will be explored. After taking this course, students should be able to critique new media and their societal effects.
  • NMAT-G 491 Professional Practices (3 cr.) Senior Seminar is the culminating capstone course for students majoring in New Media, Art, and Technology. This course marks the end of your undergraduate experience and, as such, asks you to reflect upon your undergraduate experience, demonstrate the academic abilities you have gained over the course of your academic career, and prepare for the next stages of your professional and educational life.*
  • NMAT-H 258 History of Graphic Design (3 cr.) Explore how the technologies used in graphic design have evolved, and research the consequences of those changes.
  • NMAT-S 100 Fundamental Studio Drawing (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce the drawing student to the foundation principles of drawing from observation. Through direct observation of objects, interiors, and figures students will explore different materials. Proportion, structure and composition will be covered. Students in this class work with graphite pencils, charcoal, conte crayon and pen. Students will be encouraged to find their own personal expressive creativity through various assignments.
  • NMAT-S 110 Fundamental Studio-2D (3 cr.) This course will involve a comprehensive study of design elements and principles as basic means of organizing two-dimensional space. There will be an emphasis on inventiveness and an exploration of many media.
  • NMAT-S 112 Fundamental Studio-3D (3 cr.) Volume, space, material, and physical properties studies provide the basis for exploration of three-dimensional form; includes carving, construction, modeling and casting. Materials that will be used are wood, plaster, metal and found objects.
  • NMAT-S 200 Drawing II (3 cr.) This course is designed to expand upon the drawing student’s knowledge of foundation principles of drawing from observation. Through the exploration of materials and direct observation of objects, interiors, and figures students will create advanced drawing projects. Students in this class work with colored pastels, pen and ink and colored pencils Students will be encouraged to find their own personal expressive creativity through various assignments.
  • NMAT-S 230 Painting I (3 cr.) In this course you will work throughout the semester learning and practicing observational painting techniques using acrylic paint, discovering how the artist creates and composes a well-rounded painting. It is the goal of this course to provide, in addition to the skill and knowledge necessary to make dynamic paintings, a background in aesthetics and history. Each student is expected to build upon a good foundation of drawing, design and color theory, with interest in the craft of materials, and the challenge to creatively express yourself through painting.
  • NMAT-S 240 Introduction to Printmaking Media (3 cr.) This course will provide an introduction to the basic techniques of Monotype, Relief, Intaglio, and Silkscreen Printmaking. The course will provide the beginning student with the basic terminology of printmaking and an understanding of contemporary prints.
  • NMAT-S 260 Ceramics I (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the basic skills of ceramics. You will learn how to manipulate clay in various ways to create 3D works of art. Projects are designed to introduce skills with allowance for creative thought and personal input.
  • NMAT-S 270 Spatial Art I: Theory and Practice (3 cr.) By using both conventional and unconventional materials and by reading theories across disciplines, we will delve into the creation of spatial art. In doing so, each student will build a critical and conceptual approach, develop their own artistic voice, and portray their subject in a thought-provoking manner.
  • NMAT-S 280 Metalsmithing & Jewelry Design I (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the basic skills of metalworking. You will learn how to fabricate, solder, and finish non-ferrous metal pieces. Projects are designed to introduce these skills with allowance for creative thought and personal input.
  • NMAT-S 300 Drawing III (3 cr.) This course is designed to advance the drawing student’s knowledge of materials and principles through experimentation and investigation of one’s own research. Through the exploration of materials and research of subject matter the student will create advanced drawing projects. Students in this class work with non-traditional drawing materials and tools. Students will be encouraged to find their own personal expressive creativity through various assignments.
  • NMAT-S 302 Advanced Drawing (3 cr.) This course is designed to train the advanced art student the foundation of drawing from the human figure. Through direct observation of live models and anatomical drawing aids will help the students learn to sight and translate. Proportion and structure will be stressed.  Gesture, line quality, value, composition, and human anatomy will be studied. A variety of techniques and approaches to drawing will allow each student to find their own personal expressive creativity. Conceptual figurative issues will be considered in the work in the last part of the semester.*
  • NMAT-S 322 Exploration of Materials and Process (3 cr.) This course will explore diverse art mediums and ways of working. The student may use printmaking, clay, metal, plastics, sculpture, photography and drawing in mixed media projects. The projects will involve different methods of working including intentional and intuitive methods of planning as well as collaborative works. The elements and principles of design will be infused within the objectives of the projects.
  • NMAT-S 330 Painting II (3 cr.) In this course you will work throughout the semester learning and practicing observational painting techniques discovering how the artist creates and composes a well-rounded painting using oil paints. It is the goal of this course to provide, in addition to the skill and knowledge necessary to make dynamic paintings, a background in aesthetics and history. Each student is expected to build upon a good foundation of drawing, design and color theory, with interest in the craft of materials, and the challenge to creatively express yourself through painting.*
  • NMAT-S 340 Intaglio Printmaking (3 cr.) This course will provide intermediate studies in Intaglio Printmaking. The course will build on the basic terminology and techniques of printmaking studied in S 240. There will be a continued focus on the study of contemporary prints. 
  • NMAT-S 342 Relief Printmaking (3 cr.) This course will build on the basic printmaking techniques studied in the Introduction to Printmaking Media. It will provide advanced studies in Relief Printmaking with a focus on multiple block printing and color reduction printing with linoleum and wood. The course will build on the basic terminology of printmaking studied in the introductory course and will include a focus on contemporary prints. 
  • NMAT-S 344 Silkscreen Printmaking (3 cr.) This course will provide intermediate studies in Printmaking with an introduction to the techniques of Silkscreen Printmaking. The course will build on the basic terminology and techniques of printmaking studied in S 240, but it could be taken without previous printmaking experience. There will be a focus on the study of contemporary prints and printmaking.
  • NMAT-S 360 Ceramics II (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the basic skills of wheel throwing. You will learn how to manipulate clay on the wheel to make vessels. Handles and learning how to trim and cut a foot are also a major skill that will be perfected in this semester. Projects are designed to introduce skills with allowance for creative thought and personal input.*
  • NMAT-S 370 Spatial Art II: Theory and Practice (3 cr.) By using both conventional and unconventional materials and by reading theories across disciplines, we will delve into the creation of spatial art. In doing so, each student will build a critical and conceptual approach, develop their own artistic voice, and portray their subject in a thought-provoking manner.
  • NMAT-S 380 Metalsmithing & Jewelry Design II (3 cr.) This course is designed to further introduce students to more advanced skills of metalworking. You will learn how to form non-ferrous metal pieces in various techniques. The techniques covered will be raising, forging & fold forming, chasing and repousse and various mechanisms. Projects are designed to introduce these skills with allowance for creative thought and personal input.*
  • NMAT-S 430 Painting III (3 cr.) In this course you will work throughout the semester advancing your observational painting skills while combining abstract images and practicing how the artist creates and composes a well-rounded painting. It is the goal of this course to provide, in addition to the skill and knowledge necessary to make dynamic paintings, a background in aesthetics and history. Each student is expected to build upon a good foundation of drawing, design and color theory, with interest in the craft of materials, and the challenge to creatively express your ideas through painting.*
  • NMAT-S 432 Advanced Painting (3 cr.) This is an advanced course in the use of photography and cinematography. The recent developments in digital cameras and the inclusion of video capabilities are compelling. The ability to use still and moving images are at the core of the cultural communications milieu and require our attention. This course will explore the creative use of the digital image in still and moving formats.  Emphasis will be on the possibilities provided by this advanced technology and the growing sets of delivery options available. Students will learn to think and adopt creative approaches to photography and cinematography/videography through a set of challenging class projects, exercises, demonstrations, and presentations.*
  • NMAT-S 442 Advanced Printmaking (3 cr.) This course will build on the basic printmaking techniques studied in the Introduction to Printmaking Media. It will provide advanced studies in Relief Printmaking with a focus on multiple block printing and large scaled prints. The course will build on the basic terminology of printmaking studied in the introductory course and will include a focus on contemporary prints.*
  • NMAT-S 444 Advanced Silkscreen Printmaking (3 cr.) This course will provide advanced studies in Printmaking with a focus on the techniques of Silkscreen Printmaking. The course will build on the basic terminology and techniques of printmaking studied in S 240 and S 344. There will be a focus on the study of contemporary prints and printmaking.*
  • NMAT-S 460 Ceramics III (3 cr.) This course is designed to advance students in skills of the ceramic arts. You will learn how to incorporate molds into your body of work.  Slip casting will also be a major focus in this class and how you transform these casts into a body of work will make up the majority of the projects. Projects are designed to introduce skills with allowance for creative thought and personal input.*
  • NMAT-S 470 Spatial Art III: Theory and Practice (3 cr.) By using both conventional and unconventional materials and by reading theories across disciplines, we will delve into the creation of spatial art. In doing so, each student will build a critical and conceptual approach, develop their own artistic voice, and portray their subject in a thought-provoking manner.
  • NMAT-S 472 Advanced Sculpture (3 cr.) This is an advanced course in object making and contemporary practices. This is an advanced course for juniors and seniors who are specializing in sculpture/object making in there degree and thesis for graduation.*
  • NMAT-S 480 Metalsmithing & Jewelry Design III (3 cr.) In this class you will learn the advanced techniques in jewelry and metalsmithing including enameling, marriage of metals and the lost wax vacuum casting process. Various projects will be given to advance skill in these area. Samples will be required.*
  • NMAT-S 482 Advanced Metalsmithing & Jewelry Design (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to new materials to create wearable art. You will learn about properties of different materials and how to manipulate them. Projects are designed to introduce these skills with allowance for creative thought and personal input on how materials can relate to, transform or compliment the body.*
  • NMAT-W 201 Introduction to New Media (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to New Media. Through readings and projects, students learn basic principles of web sites and other online communication, focusing on creating content, developing designs, and producing graphics. Particular attention is paid to learning web site creation and management software.*
  • NMAT-W 235 Web Design I (3 cr.) This course introduces web site design and development covering high level concerns along with hands-on activities. Topics range from infrastructure and page design to XHTML and Javascript.*
  • NMAT-W 265 JavaScript I (3 cr.) This course introduces students to fundamental programming concepts and techniques. Students will develop a solid foundation that can be used to learn other programming languages. Using the JavaScript programming language as a basis for instruction, this course focuses on client-side Web programming and teaches students how to create highly dynamic and interactive Web pages.*
  • NMAT-W 305 Physical Computing (3 cr.) This course will explore human computer interaction through the intersection of physical and software based art. Students will work with contemporary issues and problems in the arts and technology through the investigation into the digital nature of the computing object.
  • NMAT-W 315 Web Usability and Information Architecture (3 cr.) This course covers designing professional web sites. It focuses on learning principles to make web sites both well-structured and usable. Activities include web site analysis, design, and usability testing.*
  • NMAT-W 345 Programming for Artists (3 cr.) Teaches intermediate principles of web design and gives students practice creating sites using these principles and common website creation tools. Students should learn to produce professional-quality websites.*
  • NMAT-W 365 JavaScript II (3 cr.) This course discusses server-side Web programming using the PHP programming language. Through a detailed discussion of programming fundamentals, students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the server-side aspects of developing interactive Web applications. This course also offers an introductory overview of interfacing web applications with relational databases. Students are expected to develop real-world server-side Web applications.*
  • NURS-B 222 Comprehensive Health Assessment and Practicum (5 cr.) This course focuses on helping students acquire skills to conduct a comprehensive health assessment, including the physical, psychological, social, functional, and environmental aspects of health. The process of data collection, interpretation, documentation, and dissemination of assessment data will be addressed. Students will have the opportunity to use techniques of interview, observation, percussion, palpation, inspection, and auscultation in assessing clients across the life span in simulated and actual environments.
  • NURS-B 223 Promoting Healthy Populations and Practicum (4 cr.) This course focuses on preventative health care and health promotion in individuals, families, and communities, considering the influence of culture and lifespan development. Using biophysical, environmental, sociocultural and economic determinants of health, students focus on improving health outcomes with individuals, families, and communities. Students assess individuals, families, and communities, providing needed education, preventative services, and support. Students provide individual and population-based care in community-based settings, giving consideration to the perspective of those being served.
  • NURS-B 253 Professionalism in Collaborative Practice (3 cr.) Students practice communication skills for working with health team members and clients, including self-awareness, interpersonal communication, team skills, and technological communication.  Students are introduced to the scope and standards of nursing practice, roles of health team members, and components of professional practice.  Students are introduced to leadership and ethical standards.
  • NURS-B 260 Fundamentals of Nursing Practice (5 cr.) This course focuses on the fundamentals of nursing from a theoretical evidence base.  Students will gain a knowledge base for, and have an opportunity to apply fundamental nursing concepts, skills and the nursing process.  The evidence-based knowledge gained forms a basis for clinical reasoning and decision-making as students develop their nursing skills.
  • NURS-B 261 Pathophysiology and Pharmacology for Nursing Practice (4 cr.) This course provides a foundation in the pathophysiology of key disease processes and pharmacological therapies.  Principles of pathophysiology and pharmacology are presented in an integrated manner to provide a basis for study of selected medications that are used to treat or manage disease with an application to nursing practice.
  • NURS-B 304 Health Policy (3 cr.) This course focuses on CORE theoretical concepts of professional nursing practice, including health, wellness, illness, self care and caring, disease prevention and health promotion.  Students will be expected to explore theoretical premises and research related to the unique wellness perspectives and health beliefs of people across the life span in developing care outcomes consistent with maximizing individual potentials for wellness.  Students will complete a needs assessment as part of the practicum.
  • NURS-B 331 Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing Practice (3 cr.) This course bridges the nurse to the essential elements of baccalaureate professional practice.  Students examine inter- and intra-professional communication, collaboration, and teamwork to enhance quality patient care.  Students explore nursing professional organizations, issues in professional practice, and the impact of lifelone learning on career development.
  • NURS-B 334 Transitional Care of Families and Populations (5 cr.) (3 cr. didactic/2 cr. clinical)  This course uses the childbearing family as an extensive exemplar and focuses on community health:  community assessment, epidemiology, and intervention with individuals, families, communities and populations.  Students address prenatal care, normal and high risk pregnancy and childbirth, newborn care, genetic counseling, care coordination, complementary care, and environmental health.
  • NURS-B 344 Comprehensive Health Assesment (3 cr.) This course focuses on the complete health assessment, the nursing process, and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of diseases across the lifespan.  Students learn the skills of interview, inspection/palpation, percussion, and auscultation in assessing clients across the lifespan and comparing normal from abnormal findings.
  • NURS-B 403 Gerontological Nursing (3 cr.) This course promotes a holistic approach to persons in the later years of life. Death and dying, legal and ethical issues, family care giving, and future challenges will be discussed in the context of best practices as outlined by the John A Hartford Foundation: Institute for Geriatric Nursing. Note: some sections of this course are restricted to RN to BSN students.
  • NURS-B 404 Informatics (3 cr.) This course focuses on the application of nursing theory and research findings in restoring and maintaining individual and family functioning for those dealing with multi-system alterations.  Students will explore the ethical, legal and moral implications of treatment options and identify tactics to maintain nursing effectiveness in facilitating individuals and families through the health care system students will complete a scholarly analysis as part of their practicum experience.
  • NURS-H 355 Data Analysis in Clinical Practice and Health Care Research (3 cr.) This course introduces nursing and other health sciences students to the basic concepts and techniques of data analysis needed in professional health-care practice. Principles of measurement, data summarization, and univariate and bivariate statistics are examined. Differences in types of qualitative data and methods by which these types of data can be interpreted are also explored. Emphasis is placed on the application of fundamental concepts to real-world situations in client care. Note: some sections of this course are restricted to RN to BSN students.
  • NURS-H 356 Clinical Nursing Care 1: Biophysical Processes (5 cr.) (3 cr. didactic/2 cr. clinical)  This course focuses on providing nursing care for individuals and families with acute and chronic biophysical illnesses across the lifespan.  Particular attention is focused on developing clinical reasoning and competent nursing practice at a beginning level.
  • NURS-H 360 Clinical Nursing Care 2: Interactive Processes (5 cr.) (3 cr. didactic/2 cr. clinical)  This course focuses on nursing care management of individuals and families experiencing acute and chronic problems related to interaction with the environment and others:  sensory, motor, cognitive, affective, and interpersonal processes.  Using a holistic approach this course addresses health problems occurring across the lifespan.
  • NURS-H 361 Alterations in Health II (3 cr.) This course builds on Alterations in Health I and continues to focus on pathophysiology and holistic nursing care management of clients experiencing acute and chronic health problems and their associated needs.
  • NURS-H 362 Alterations in Health II: Practicum (2 cr.) Students will continue to apply the science and technology of nursing to perform all independent, dependent, and interdependent care functions. Students will engage clients in a variety of settings to address alterations in health functioning.
  • NURS-H 363 The Developing Family and Child (4 cr.) This course focuses on the needs of individuals and their families who are facing the phenomena of growth and development during the childbearing and child raising phases of family development. Factors dealing with preserving, promoting, and restoring health status of family members will be emphasized.
  • NURS-H 364 The Developing Family and Child: Practicum (2 cr.) Students will have the opportunity to work with childbearing and child raising families, including those experiencing alterations in health.
  • NURS-H 365 Nursing Research (2 cr.) This course is on development of students’ skills in using the research process to define clinical research problems and to determine the usefulness of research in clinical decisions related to practice. The critique of nursing and nursing related research studies will be emphasized in identifying applicability to nursing practice. (C: NURS-H 361, NURS-H 362, NURS-H 363, NURS-H 364).  For RN to BSN students this is a 3 credit course.
  • NURS-H 371 Clinical Nursing Care 3: Adaptive Processes (5 cr.) (3 cr. didactic/2 cr. clinical)  This course builds on H356 Biophysical Processes.  The primary focus is on the nursing care management of individuals and families experiencing acute and chronic health problems using an adaptive and holistic approach.  Particular attention is focused on developing clinical reasoning and competent nursing practice at an intermediate level.
  • NURS-K 301 The Art and Science of Complementary Health (3 cr.) This course will serve as an introduction to a variety of complementary therapies, including healing touch, guided imagery, hypnosis, acupuncture, aromatherapy, reflexology, and massage. The class will critically examine each therapy through assigned readings, literature reviews, presentations, guest lecturers, and optional experiential activities. Note: some sections of this course are restricted to RN to BSN students.
  • NURS-K 304 Nursing Specialty Elective (3 cr.) This course allows the RN to BSN student to apply nationally recognized specialty nursing knowledge and skills to the BSN degree, through a portfolio or independent study approach. National specialty standards will be used to devise learning objectives, implementation and evaluation plan. This course is restricted to RN to BSN students only.
  • NURS-K 305 New Innovation in Health and Health Care (3 cr.) This course explores emergent trends in health and health care, including technological advances in health care, developing approaches to care based on new knowledge and/ or research findings, and trends in health care delivery in a themed, survey or independent study format. Note: some sections of this course are restricted to RN to BSN students.
  • NURS-K 415 Special Needs Children in the Community (2-4 cr.) This course focuses on children with special health needs in the community setting. Concepts of growth and development will be explored in relationship to the identified health needs. Principles of health education, health maintenance, and health promotion will be integrated in the experiential component of the course.
  • NURS-K 432 Korean Culture and Healthcare (1 cr.) This course provides a forum for students to explore Korean culture in terms of history, culture, language, business, foods, traditions, perspectives, and healthcare. Students interact with their peers from a Korean University.
  • NURS-K 433 Korean Culture and Healthcare: Practicum (2 cr.) This 2-week cultural immersion experience is based at a school of nursing in South Korea. Students will participate in classroom, laboratory, clinical, cultural and leisure time activities with Korean students.
  • NURS-K 434 Global Health Issues in Nursing (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide learning opportunities to acquire knowledge about global health issues, the diverse conditions that contribute to health and global health disparities, and an understanding of nursing's role in addressing these health problems. Issues addressed include infectious and chronic illness, reproductive and womens health issues, politics and public health policy, economics and health care, and health in conflict environments. Conceptual models and health equity concepts, evidence-based  practice, and health care delivery systems are analyzed to explore strategies for addressing global health issues. Learning opportunities emphasize the knowledge and skills needed to use technology to investigate global health issues, advocate for health justice from a human rights perspective, and critically appraise global health issues.
  • NURS-K 435 A Multidisciplinary Approach to Rehab (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce the student to a multidisciplinary approach to rehabilitation that can be used across all settings.  The class will highlight the role of each discipline, including the physiatrist, nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech/language therapist, respiratory therapist, dietician, psychologist, chaplain, program director, patient care technician and discharge planner as well as demonstrate how using a multidisciplinary approach will lead to better patient outcomes.  The course will challenge the critical thinking of the student to consider this approach in common rehab diagnoses including but not limited to stroke, brain injury, spinal cord injury, joint replacements, etc.
  • NURS-K 440 Critical Care Elective (2 cr.) Students will hear presentations and participate in discussions related to critical care concepts and hemodynamic monitoring.
  • NURS-K 441 Critical Care Clinical (2 cr.) Students will participate in a preceptored critical care clinical experiences and simulations to promote critical thinking. Students are selected for this practicum.
  • NURS-K 490 Clinical Nursing Elective (1-6 cr.) Planned and supervised clinical experience in an area of concentration. Course is S/F graded.
  • NURS-K 492 Nursing Elective (1-6 cr.) Opportunity for the student to pursue study in an area of interest.
  • NURS-K 499 Genetics and Genomics (3 cr.) This course introduces a basic knowledge of genetics in health care, including genetic variation and inheritance; ethical, legal, and social issues in genetic health care; genetic therapeutics; nursing roles; genetic basis of selected alterations to health across the life span; and cultural considerations in genetic health care are all considered. Note: some sections of this course are restricted to RN to BSN students.
  • NURS-L 230 Health Care Delivery Systems (3 cr.) Students examine health care delivery systems, leadership, health policy, regulation and economics.  Students explore quality practices of health care organizations.  Students analyze the impact of informatics on health care and nursing, including the electronic health record, information technology in healthcare, and information literacy.
  • NURS-P 216 Pharmacology (3 cr.) This course focuses on basic principles of pharmacology. It includes the pharmacologic properties of major drug classes and individual drugs, with an emphasis on the clinical application of drug therapy through the nursing process.
  • NURS-P 345 Pharmacology (3 cr.) This course focuses on principles of pharmacology for professional nursing practice. It includes the pharmacologic properties of major drug classes and individual drugs, with an emphasis on the clinical application of drug therapy through the nursing process.
  • NURS-R 375 Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3 cr.) This course focuses on nursing research and evidence-based practice.  Students develop skills in retrieving and appraising literature relevant to clinical problems, understanding the research process, and critiquing evidence from research publications and other sources to inform evidence-based nursing practice.
  • NURS-R 470 Clinical Baccalaureate Nursing Capstone (3 cr.) This course allows students to synthesize knowledge skills learned in the baccalaureate program and to demonstrate competencies consistent with program outcomes and to refine their nursing practice skills.  Students will plan and organize  learning experiences, design a project, and practice professional nursing in a safe and effective manner.
  • NURS-S 470 Restorative Health Related to Multi-System Failures (3 cr.) This course focuses on the pathophysiology and nursing care management of clients experiencing multisystem alterations in health status. Correlations among complex system alterations and nursing interventions to maximize health potential are emphasized.
  • NURS-S 471 Restorative Health Related to Multi-System Failures: Practicum (2 cr.) The students will apply the nursing process to the care of clients experiencing acute multi-system alterations in health.
  • NURS-S 472 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community (3 cr.) This course focuses on the complexity and diversity of groups or aggregates within communities and their corresponding health care needs. Through a community assessment of health trends, demographics, epidemiological data, and social/political issues in local and global communities, the student will be able to determine effective interventions for community-centered care.
  • NURS-S 473 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community: Practicum (2 cr.) Students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts of community assessment, program planning, prevention, and epidemiology to implement and evaluate interventions for community-centered care to groups or aggregates. Professional nursing will be practiced in collaboration with diverse groups within a community.
  • NURS-S 474 Applied Healthcare Ethics (3 cr.) Building on the ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses, this course explores the nurse’s role in ethical clinical practice, academic work, health policy, and research conduct, focusing particularly on the advocacy role of the nurse. Common ethical problems are discussed and strategies for resolution of ethical dilemmas are applied. Note: some sections of this course are restricted to RN to BSN students.
  • NURS-S 475 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community: RN to BSN (3 cr.) Basic epidemiological principles and community health nursing models are applied in collaboration with diverse groups. Disease prevention strategies are applied to individuals and populations to promote health. Students apply the concepts of community assessment, disease prevention, and health promotion to plan, implement, and evaluate interventions for populations in the community. This course is restricted to RN to BSN students only.
  • NURS-S 481 Nursing Management (2 cr.) This course focuses on the development of management skills assumed by professional nurses, including delegation of responsibilities, networking, facilitation of groups, conflict resolution, leadership, case management and collaboration. Concepts addressed include organizational structure, change, managing quality and performance, workplace diversity, budgeting and resource allocation, and delivery systems.
  • NURS-S 482 Nursing Management: Practicum (2 cr.) Students will have the opportunity to apply professional management skills in a variety of nursing leadership roles.
  • NURS-S 483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone (3 cr.) Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate competencies consistent with program outcomes and to refine their nursing care practice skills. Students will collaborate with faculty and a preceptor in choosing a care setting, planning and organizing a learning experience, and practicing professional nursing in a safe and effective manner.
  • NURS-S 485 Professional Growth and Empowerment (3 cr.) This course focuses on issues related to professional practice, career planning, personal goal setting, and empowerment of self and others. Students will discuss factors related to job performance, performance expectations and evaluation, reality orientation, and commitment to life-long learning.
  • NURS-S 487 Nursing Management: RN to BSN (3 cr.) This course focuses on development of management skills assumed by professional nurses, including delegation of responsibilities, networking, and facilitation of groups, conflict resolution, leadership, case management, and collaboration. Concepts addressed include organizational structure, delivery systems, change, managing quality and performance, budgeting and resource allocation, staffing, scheduling, evaluation and career development. This course is restricted to RN to BSN students only.
  • NURS-Z 490 Clinical Experience in Nursing (1-6 cr.) Planned and supervised clinical experiences in the area of the student's major interest. S/F graded.
  • NURS-Z 492 Individual Study in Nursing (1-6 cr.) Opportunity for the student to pursue independent study of topics in nursing under the guidance of a selected faculty member.
  • PAHM-H 320 Health Systems Administration (3 cr.) An overview of the U.S. health care delivery system. It examines the organization, function, and role of the system; current system problems; and alternative systems or solutions.
  • PAHM-H 352 Healthcare Finance I (3 cr.) A study of the financial management of health care facilities, based on generally accepted business principles. Accounting and managerial control of cash, accounts receivable, inventory control, budgeting, and cost control, as well as accounting and evaluation of short- and long-term debt will be examined.
  • PAHM-H 354 Health Economics (3 cr.) This course applies economics to the study of administrative and policy issues in the health care sector. Economic concepts are used to explain the system of health care financing and the organization of health care delivery in the U.S. The economic evaluation of health care programs is also discussed.
  • PAHM-H 365 Health Administration Practicum (3 cr.) The Health Administration Practicum will consist of a personal career-planning component coupled with weekly field visits to health care agencies in central Indiana. Students must perform satisfactorily in both parts of the practicum to receive a passing grade.
  • PAHM-H 401 Strategic Planning for Health Care Organizations (3 cr.) This course examines strategic planning techniques as they apply to health care organizations. Students will develop and defend a comprehensive strategic plan for a case facility. One half of the course will be conducted in a workshop format.
  • PAHM-H 402 Hospital Administration (3 cr.) The study of organization, structure, function, and fiscal operations within hospitals. The role of the hospital in the community, relationship to official and voluntary health agencies, coordination of hospital departments, and managerial involvement will be examined.
  • PAHM-H 411 Long-Term Care Administration (3 cr.) Nursing home regulations, legal aspects, and insurance; personnel management; medical records; diet and food service; rehabilitation; nursing services; psychiatric aspects in handling of geriatric patients; professional standards; use of volunteer groups.
  • PAHM-H 432 Health Care Marketing (3 cr.) A practical study of marketing in health care institutions, health service organizations, and health insurers. A basic foundation in marketing principles, new methods in marketing products and services, and inexpensive marketing techniques will be examined.
  • PAHM-H 441 Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration (3 cr.) An overview of the liability and legal responsibility, as well as legal recourse, that health care facilities may exercise. This course will discuss policies and standards relating to health facility administration. Also included is a discussion of financial aspects unique to the hospital/ health care facility environment, such as third-party payments and federal assistance.
  • PAHM-H 455 Topics in Public Health (1-3 cr.) Extensive discussion of selected topics in public health. The topic may change from semester to semester, based on resource availability and student demand. May be repeated for credit.
  • PAHM-H 456 Health Care Reimbursement (3 cr.) Course examines the organizational structures of managed care as used in the health industry. The strengths and weaknesses of managed care organizations are examined, as well as the performance of both public and private managed care organizations. Course also examines and discusses current issues surrounding managed care.
  • PAHM-H 474 Health Administration Ethics Seminar (3 cr.) This course examines health care ethical decision making challenges from the managerial perspective and explores broader policy issues associated with ethical problems in health care institutions. It provides an overview of general theories of ethical challenges in everyday managerial coursework.
  • PAHM-V 130 Current Topics in Public Affairs (1-3 cr.) Readings and discussion of current public affairs issues and problems. May be repeated for credit.
  • PAHM-V 171 Introduction to Public Administration (3 cr.) Broad coverage of public affairs through critical and analytical inquiry into policy making at all levels of government. Particular emphasis on intergovernmental relations as they affect policy in the federal system.
  • PAHM-V 221 Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.) This course provides a broad overview of the U.S. nonprofit sector. Topics include the sector's size and scope and its religious, historical, and theoretical underpinnings. It also examines perspectives on why people organize, donate to, and volunteer for nonprofit organizations, and looks at current challenges that the sector faces.
  • PAHM-V 263 Public Management (3 cr.) This course is an examination of the management process in public organizations in the United States. Special attention will be given to external influences on public managers, the effects of the intergovernmental environment, and, in particular, problems of management in a democratic, limited government system.
  • PAHM-V 264 Urban Structure and Policy (3 cr.) An introduction to urban government and policy issues. Topics include: urban government structure and policy making, the economic foundations and development of cities, demography of cities and suburbs, land-use planning, and other selected urban policy problems.
  • PAHM-V 272 Terrorism and Public Policy (3 cr.) A survey of the incidence of terrorism in democratic societies, with particular emphasis on public policy responses designed to combat terrorism in cities. Overviews of ongoing conflicts with terrorist organizations in various countries are interspersed with analyses of significant terrorist events and public policies and responses such events create.
  • PAHM-V 275 Introduction to Emergency Management (3 cr.) An examination of the background and nature of the profession, the central theoretical debates concerning natural and human-induced disasters, mitigating and reacting to these catastrophic events, and the major roles and responsibilities of emergency managers. Current practical problems and future directions will be explored.
  • PAHM-V 346 Introduction to Government Accounting and Financial Reporting (3 cr.) An introduction to government accounting, including comparison with accounting for the private sector; intended as background for the use of financial administrators. The course primarily deals with municipal accounting. Not open to students with more than seven credit hours of accounting.
  • PAHM-V 362 Nonprofit Management and Leadership (3 cr.) Students in this course examine the management practices of nonprofit organizations. The course encourages students to take the perspectives of nonprofit managers, volunteers, board members, policy-makers, donors, and clients. Course projects expand understanding of the nonprofit sector and develop students’ management skills, analytical tools, and knowledge.
  • PAHM-V 366 Managing Behavior in Public Organizations (3 cr.) This course provides an introduction to the management of people in public organizations. Focus is on behavioral science in management and related analytical and experiential applications.
  • PAHM-V 368 Managing Government Operations (3 cr.) Application of analytical techniques to operating decisions in the public management sector. Cases are used extensively to illustrate the application of techniques (such as charting, capacity and demand analysis, forecasting, performance measurement, decision analysis, queuing/simulation, Markov modeling, and cost-effective analysis) to design, scheduling, and inventory assignment, transportation, and replacement decisions.
  • PAHM-V 370 Research Methods and Statistical Modeling (3 cr.) This course will introduce the student to the basic methods, issues, analytical techniques, and ethical considerations of evaluation research.
  • PAHM-V 372 Government Finance and Budgets (3 cr.) Study of fiscal management in public agencies, including revenue administration, and fiscal federalism. Examples and applications to contemporary government decisions.
  • PAHM-V 373 Human Resource Management in the Public Sector (3 cr.) The organization and operation of public personnel management systems, with emphasis on concepts and techniques of job analysis, position classification, training, affirmative action, and motivation.
  • PAHM-V 376 Law and Public Policy (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the origins, process, and impact of law in the making and implementing of public policy. The course’s major objective is to provide students with the substantive concepts necessary to understand the judicial system and law in its various forms.
  • PAHM-V 378 Policy Processes in the United States (3 cr.) Course content includes analytical perspectives of the policy process, the centers of policy, and the public interest. Selected cases involving problem analysis and decision making on public issues are included, as well as discussion of current policy issues.
  • PAHM-V 379 Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation (3 cr.) This course provides an overview of program evaluation as it relates to public affairs, criminal justice, health policy, and environmental science with particular emphasis on measuring program outcomes. The course is designed for students who envision themselves working in management, policy-making, or research roles.
  • PAHM-V 380 Internship in Public and Environmental Affairs (1-6 cr.) Students are placed with public agencies or governmental units for assignment to a defined task relevant to their educational interests in public affairs. Tasks may involve staff work or research. Full-time participants may earn up to 6 credit hours. May be repeated for credit. Course is graded S/F (Satisfactory/Fail).
  • PAHM-V 386 Case Studies for Policy Analysis (3 cr.) This course focuses on analyzing case studies of public policies using a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including application of the principles and concepts of intermediate microeconomic theory.
  • PAHM-V 387 Public Administration and Emergency Management (3 cr.) An examination of the American federal system and how it affects policy making and emergency management. Topics include government programs, participation of agencies and actors from all three levels of government, the nonprofit sector, and the private sector. Administrative processes involved in managing major hazards and disasters will be presented.
  • PAHM-V 405 Public Law and the Legislative Process (3 cr.) This course focuses on Congress as a policy-making body in the U.S. public law system. It covers the constitutional framework for congressional operations, as well as technical aspects of the legislative process such as bill drafting and analysis, the role of leadership, and the prerogatives of individual members.
  • PAHM-V 412 Leadership and Ethics (3 cr.) This course is designed to examine the complex leadership issues and challenges facing communities and to explore how citizens and government can work together to address these challenges. This includes exploration of how the problems, conflicts, and dilemmas encountered by leaders when making decisions must be considered within an ethical framework.
  • PAHM-V 443 Managing Workforce Diversity (3 cr.) The composition and nature of the workforce is changing. Managers must decide how to accommodate real differences among the members of their organizations. This course seeks to provide information for practitioners who hope to integrate an understanding of workforce diversity into their management style and professional behavior.
  • PAHM-V 444 Public Administrative Organization (3 cr.) A review of research findings and analysis of the operation of public agencies and their performance.
  • PAHM-V 460 Intergovernmental Relations (3 cr.) Overview of the dynamics of multi-organizational governance in the United States. Examination of federal and other systems. Structure and operations of intergovernmental programs and the role of managers within these systems.
  • PAHM-V 473 Management, Leadership, and Policy (3 cr.) This course seeks to integrate learning across the public affairs curriculum. Students will review and reflect about their learning in management, leadership, and policy. Experiential methods service learning, projects, cases, and exercises – will be used to help students apply theory, concepts, and skills.
  • PHIL-P 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.) Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, and in the philosophy of religion. Readings in selected writings of philosophers from Plato to the present.
  • PHIL-P 105 Critical Thinking (3 cr.) Basic rules of correct reasoning; roles of definitions and language in thinking; roles of observation, hypothesis and theory in knowledge and basic techniques for gather information, testing and evaluating arguments for truth and problem solving.
  • PHIL-P 140 Elementary Ethics (3 cr.) Some ancient, medieval, or modern philosophers’ answers to ethical problems (e.g., nature of good and evil, relation of duty to self-interest, objectivity of moral judgments).
  • PHIL-P 145 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) Fundamental problems of social and political philosophy: the nature of the state, political obligation, freedom and liberty, quality, justice, rights, social change, revolution, and community. Readings from classical and contemporary sources.
  • PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.) Development of critical tools for the evaluation of arguments.
  • PHIL-P 242 Applied Ethics (3 cr.) Application of moral theory to a variety of personal, social, and political contexts, such as world hunger, nuclear weapons, social justice, life and death decisions, and problems in medical ethics.
  • PHIL-P 304 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.) Selected survey of post-Kantian philosophy, including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Mill.
  • PHIL-P 311 Environmental Ethics (3 cr.) Selective survey of philosophical problems concerning environmental ethics. Topics may include defining environment, different approaches to the study of environmental ethics, determining the value of environment, issues of preservation and sustainability and the relationship between human social issues and environmental values.
  • PHIL-P 335 Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Selective survey of central themes in nineteenth- and twentieth- century phenomenology and existentialism. Readings from some or all of Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Beauvoir, and Sartre.
  • PHIL-P 342 Problems in Ethics (3 cr.) May concentrate on a single large problem, e.g., whether utilitarianism is an adequate ethical theory, or several more or less independent problems, e.g., the nature of goodness, the relation of good to ought, the objectivity of moral judgments.
  • PHIL-P 345 Problems in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) Problems of contemporary relevance: civil disobedience, participatory democracy, conscience and authority, law and morality.
  • PHIL-P 346 Classics in Philosophy of Art (3 cr.) P: 3 cr. of Philosophy. Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche and Dewey. Topics include the definition of art, the nature of beauty, and art and society.
  • PHIL-P 360 Introduction to Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.) Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g., thinking, volition, perception, emotion); the mind-body problem (e.g., dualism, behaviorism, functionalism); connections to cognitive science issues in psychology, linguistics, and artificial intelligence; computational theories of mind.
  • PHIL-P 371 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.) Topics include the nature of religion, religious experience, the status of claims of religious knowledge, the nature and existence of God.
  • PHIL-P 375 Philosophy of Law (3 cr.) Selective survey of philosophical problems concerning law and the legal system. Topics include nature and validity of law, morality and law, legal obligation, judicial decision, rights, justice, responsibility, and punishment.
  • PHIL-P 383 Topics in Philosophy (3 cr.) An advanced study of special, experimental, or timely topics drawn from the full range of philosophical discussion and designed to pursue interests unmet in the regular curriculum.
  • PHSL-P 215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.) Fall, Spring.  Functional aspects of cells, tissues, organs, and systemes in mammalian organisms.  Designed for pre-professional students in allied health, nursing, and health science.*
  • PHSL-P 416 Comparative Animal Physiology (3 cr.) Alternate years.  Physiological principles of the respiratory, circulatory, excretory, and related systems in a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate animals.  
  • PHSL-P 418 Laboratory in Comparative Animal Physiology (2 cr.) Laboratory experiments using a variety of animals to illustrate physiological principles.*  
  • PHYS-P 100 Physics in the Modern World (5 cr.) Fall, Spring. This course develops concepts in physics and places them in the context of our modern, technological world. Topics include motion, gravity, sound, optics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics and elements of quantum phenomena. Cannot be substituted for physics courses explicitly designated in specified curricula. No credit in this course will be given for students who have already passed PHYS-P 201-202 or PHYS-P 221-222.
  • PHYS-P 201 General Physics I (5 cr.) Fall alternate years.  Newtonian mechanics, oscillations and waves, bulk properties of matter and thermodynamics.*  
  • PHYS-P 202 General Physics II (5 cr.) Spring alternate years. Electricity and magnetism, geometrical and physical optics, and modern physics. 
  • PHYS-P 221 Physics I (5 cr.) Alternate years.  This course is the first semester of a two semester sequence of calculus-based, introductory physics. In PHYS-P 221, we will explore Newtonian mechanics, fluid dynamics, oscillations and waves, thermodynamics, and elementary kinetic energy.  
  • PHYS-P 222 Physics II (5 cr.) Spring Alternate years.  This course is the second semester of a two semester sequence of calculus-based, introductory physics. In PHYS-P 222, we will focus primarily on electricity and magnetism. We will also learn about geometrical and physical optics, the special theory of relativity and elements of contemporary physics.  
  • PHYS-P 301 Contemporary Physics (3 cr.) Arr.  Introduction to modern physics. Atomic and nuclear physics, kinetic theory, relativity, elementary particles.
  • PHYS-P 310 Environmental Physics (3 cr.) Relationship of physics to current environmental problems. Energy production, comparison of sources and by-products; nature of and possible solutions to problems of noise; particulate matter in atmosphere. 
  • PHYS-S 406 Research Project (1 - 6 cr.) Research participation in group or independent project under the supervision of a faculty member in departmental research areas; or topic agreed upon between the student and supervisor.
  • PLSC-B 203 Survey of the Plant Kingdom (5 cr.) Survey of various groups of plants, including their structure, behavior, life histories, classification, and economic importance.*
  • PLSC-B 364 Summer Flowering Plants (5 cr.) Summer  A course for students desiring a broad, practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants.*  
  • POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.) Every semester. Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system and its political party base.
  • POLS-Y 215 Introduction to Political Theory (3 cr.) Every three semesters. An introduction to major ideas and theories in Western political thought, including theories of democracy and the analysis of conflict and cooperation. The course also addresses the attempts made by prominent political philosophers – from Aristotle and Plato to Locke, Marx, and Rawls – to understand and describe the nature of politics.
  • POLS-Y 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) Every three semesters. A course that introduces students to the major political systems of the world. Students will study systems within Western and non-Western countries. Comparisons will include executive and legislative structures, elections, political parties, interest groups and key areas of public policy. Not open to students who have completed POLS-Y 107.
  • POLS-Y 219 Introduction to International Relations (3 cr.) An introduction to the global political system, and issues that shape relations among countries. The course looks at problems of conflict resolution, the role of international law and organizations, the challenges of poverty and development, and the other major policy issues over which nations cooperate, argue, or go to war. Not open to students who have completed POLS-Y 109.
  • POLS-Y 301 Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.) Theories of American party activity; behavior of political parties, interest groups, and social movements; membership in groups; organization and structure; evaluation and relationship to the process of representation.
  • POLS-Y 304 Constitutional Law (3 cr.) Nature and function of law and judicial process; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the American constitutional system.
  • POLS-Y 311 Democracy and National Security (3 cr.) Exploration of a basic dilemma in a democratic polity: How can demands for national security be reconciled with democratic practices and values? Concepts of civil-military relations, national security structure, professional and political commitments of the military, human resource utilization, popular control of policy, and the nature of individual liberty.
  • POLS-Y 338 African Politics (3 cr.) Politics in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include processes of nation building, dependency and underdevelopment; role of political parties, leadership, ideology, and military rule; continuing relevance of colonial heritage and traditional culture; network of international relations; and special situation of South Africa.
  • POLS-Y 360 United States Foreign Policy (3 cr.) Analysis of institutions and processes involved in the formation and implementation of United States foreign policy. Emphasis is on post-World War II policies.
  • POLS-Y 480 Undergraduate Readings in Political Science (arr cr.) Every semester. Individual readings and research. May be taken only with consent of the instructor.
  • POLS-Y 481 Field Experience in Political Science (arr cr.) P: junior or senior standing and approval of instructor. Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process through internship experience in local, state, or national government.
  • POLS-Y 490 Senior Seminar in Political Science (3 cr.) Alternate years, Spring Semester. Senior Seminar for History/Political Science majors. P: consent of instructor.
  • PSY-B 421 Internship in Psychology (3 cr.) This course completes the clinical-focus (Helping Skills-Practicum) sequence for the IU Kokomo psychology major.  By completing 120 hours of supervised work at an approved practicum site, students will engage in the experiential learning needed to prepare them for meaningful work in the field of psychology after graduation.
  • PSY-B 388 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) Variable scheduling. P: P103 and Sophomore standing. A survey of human sexuality to increase knowledge and comfort regarding sexuality in a variety of aspects, i.e. sexual behavior and response, influences of culture and environmental factors, psychological issues, disability effects on sexuality, sexual research, anatomy and physiology
  • PSY-K 300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) Fall and Spring. P: MATH-M 118 or MATH-M 119 or equivalent. Introduction to statistics, nature of statistical data, ordering and manipulation of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference decision- making, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods.
  • PSY-P 103 General Psychology (3 cr.) Fall, Spring, and Summer. Introduction to psychology: its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, psychophysiology, individual differences, personality development, and abnormal and social psychology.
  • PSY-P 216 Life Span Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) Fall, Spring, and Summer. P: PSY-P 103. A survey course that integrates the basic concepts of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from the prenatal period to death. Throughout the life span, theories, research, and critical issues in developmental psychology are explored, with consideration of practical implications. Credit not to be given for both PSY-P 216 and PSY-P 316.
  • PSY-P 259 Introduction to Psychological Inquiry (3 cr.) Fall and Spring.  P: PSY-P 103 and ENG-W 132.  Students entering the psychology major in Fall 2012 or after are required to take this course. Credit not to be given for both PSY-P 211 Methods of Experimental Psychology, and Introduction to Psychological Inquiry.  This course was taught under the course number P390 Special Topics, VT: Introduction to Psychological Inquiry, until Fall 2014.  This course will provide psychology majors with an introduction to the basic processes of psychological inquiry.  Students will be assisted in becoming more effective learners and critical thinkers, reading primary literature in psychology, and conducting basic survey research as well as learning about the most common methods in psychological research. This course will also include an overview of the psychology major and opportunities for graduate study and careers.
  • PSY-P 303 Health Psychology (3 cr.) Every Spring. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Focuses on role of psychological factors in health and illness. Through readings, lecture, and discussion, students will become better consumers of research on behavior-health interactions and develop a broad base of knowledge concerning how behavior and other psychological factors can impart health both positively and negatively.
  • PSY-P 316 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) Every Fall. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth; factors that influence behavior.  Credit not to be given for both PSY-P 216 and PSY-P 316.
  • PSY-P 319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.) Every fall. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Methods and results of scientific study of personality. Basic concepts of personality traits and their measurements; developmental influences; problems of integration.
  • PSY-P 320 Social Psychology (3 cr.) Every Spring. The study of psychological theories and research dealing with social influence and social behavior, including topics such as conformity, personal perception, aggression, attitudes, and group dynamics.
  • PSY-P 322 Psychology in the Courtroom (3 cr.) Spring, 2016. Alternate years. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. This course considers the psychological aspects of roles and interactions in the courtroom. Topics include: definitions of “sanity” and “competency”, eyewitness testimony, jury selection, instructions, and the role of psychologists as “expert witnesses” and jury selection consultants. Emphasis will be placed on empirical law-psychology research.
  • PSY-P 324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) Fall and Spring. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. A first course in abnormal psychology, with emphasis on forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretation, and final manifestations.
  • PSY-P 325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) Every Fall. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Facts and principles of human and animal learning, especially as treated in theories attempting to provide a framework for understanding what learning is and how it takes place.
  • PSY-P 326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) Every Spring.  P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. R: BIOL-L 100 or BIOL-L 105. Central nervous system functions in relation to sensory processes, motivation, and learning.
  • PSY-P 327 Psychology of Motivation (3 cr.) Fall 2015, then every Fall.  P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. How needs, desires, and incentives influence behavior; research on motivational processes in human and animal behavior, including ways in which motives change and develop.
  • PSY-P 335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) Every Spring. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking.
  • PSY-P 355 Experimental Psychology (3 cr.) Fall and Spring. P: P259 or P390 Introduction to Psychological Inquiry, PSY-K 300. Scientific methods applied to the problems of psychology. Design and execution of simple psychological experiments, treatment of results, and preparation of written reports. This course is required for students entering the psychology major in Fall, 2012 or later. Students entering the major prior to Fall, 2012 are NOT required to take this course.
  • PSY-P 364 Multicultural Issues in Counseling (3 cr.) This course is meant to provide you a thorough introduction of working with diverse groups in therapy settings.  We will cover the mostly likely to be treated groups but may visit others as a part of student interest and extra time.  Consider this a course that will move you beyond your current understanding of diversity and allow you to consider different worldviews and issues that relate to those who are both similar and dissimilar from you.  This course is designed to also increase self-awareness and facilitate appreciation of group differences as well as similarities.  It will also focus on how to create system-level change in regard to racial and ethnic group relations.
  • PSY-P 367 Psychology of Addictions (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to examine both behavioral and substance-based addictions from a variety of viewpoints (e.g., historical, neurobiological, social, treatment, etc).  Etiology and outcomes associated with addiction, as well as comorbidity and other addiction-related phenomena will also be reviewed.
  • PSY-P 381 Helping Skills and Ethics (3 cr.) Every Fall and Spring. P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Introduction to the helping relationship, including theories and strategies of effective helping, ethical issues, and limitations of the helper role.
  • PSY-P 391 Psychology of Gender and Ethnicity (3 cr.) Variable scheduling. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Basic psychological concepts and research from the perspectives of gender and ethnicity, focusing on both the similarities and differences across gender and ethnic groups. Explores the impact of social and political forces on psychological development and adjustment. Contemporary theory on ethnicity, gender, and class will also be examined.
  • PSY-P 407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.) Every fall. P: PSY-P 103 and Sophomore standing. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function.
  • PSY-P 430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.) Variable scheduling. P: P324 and P325 or consent of instructor. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions.
  • PSY-P 459 History and Systems of Psychology (3 cr.) Fall and Spring. P: PSY-P 103 and completion of 12 credit hours of psychology. This is the capstone course for psychology majors, and requires instructor permission for enrollment.  Historical background and critical evaluation of major theoretical systems of modern psychology: structuralism, functionalism, associationism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, and psychoanalysis. Methodological problems of theory construction and system-making. Emphasizes integration of recent trends.
  • PSY-P 493 Supervised Research I (3 cr.) Scheduled with agreement of instructor, Fall, Spring, or Summer. P: consent of instructor. Active participation in research. An independent experiment of modest magnitude; course will include a research proposal submitted to the appropriate research ethics review board. Students who enroll in PSY-P 493 will be expected to enroll in PSY-P 494.
  • PSY-P 494 Supervised Research II (3 cr.) Scheduled with agreement of instructor, Fall, Spring, or Summer.  P: PSY-P 493. A continuation of PSY-P 493. Course will include a journal-type report of the two semesters of work.
  • PSY-P 495 Readings and Research in Psychology (1-3 cr.) This course involves participation in a supervised field experience of at least 120 on-site hours, in an applied area. Common placements involve problems of the mentally retarded, children, the elderly, family relations, industrial relations, and mental health. Reflective writing is also required.
  • REL-R 152 Introduction to Religions of the West (3 cr.) Origins, development, institutions, beliefs, and current status.
  • REL-R 153 Introduction to Religions of the East (3 cr.) Human ideas and value systems in the religions of India, China, and Japan.
  • REL-R 212 Comparative Religions (3 cr.) Approaches to the comparison of recurrent themes, religious attitudes, and practices found in selected Eastern and Western traditions.
  • REL-R 233 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) (3 cr.) A critical examination of the literary, political, cultural, and religious history of Israel from the period of the Patriarchs to the Restoration, with emphasis on the growth and formation of the major traditions contained in the Hebrew Bible.
  • REL-R 243 Introduction to the New Testament (3 cr.) An examination of the history, culture, and literature of the New Testament period, with special emphasis on the emergence of early Christian beliefs.
  • SOC-R 320 Sexuality and Society (3 cr.) The study of social issues and problems related to human sexuality using sociological perpectives. Examines diversity with regard to in sexual practices among various cultures and categories of people. Includes sociological research about topics such as the use of sex in the media and advertising, social controversies surrounding sexual orientation, and the sexualization of children.
  • SOC-S 100 Introduction to Sociology (3 cr.) Every semester. Introduction to the concepts and methods of sociology with a focus on American Society as well as global issues.
  • SOC-S 101 Social Problems and Policies (3 cr.) Every semester. Provides an introduction to sociology through an in-depth study of major social problems; explores the policy implications of the general sociological perspective and of sociological knowledge of particular problems. Problems include population, drug use, science and technology, and poverty.
  • SOC-S 252 Methods of Sociological Research (3 cr.) Offered every Fall Semester (P: 3 credit hours of sociology i.e. S100 or S101). This course is required for majors and is recommended to be completed in Sophomore or Junior year. An overview of methods and techniques used by sociologists for gathering and interpreting information about human social behavior. 
  • SOC-S 314 Social Aspects of Health and Medicine (3 cr.) Survey of the nature of health care systems. Patient and professional role behavior are explored, as well as the characteristics of different health care settings (P: 3 credit hours of sociology). 
  • SOC-S 316 The Family (3 cr.) The sociological study of family relationships and the interconnections between the individual, family and wider society. Considers American families and other cultures. Emphasis on theories and empirical research explaining family patterns. (P: 3 credit hours of sociology). 
  • SOC-S 317 Social Stratification (3 cr.) Functioning and maintenance of systems of social stratification in local communities, societies, and the global context. Correlates and consequences of social class position and mobility. (P: 3 credit hours of sociology). 
  • SOC-S 325 Criminology (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Factors in genesis of crime and organization of criminal behavior from points of view of the person and the group.
  • SOC-S 328 Juvenile Delinquency (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Legal definition of delinquency, measurement and distribution of delinquency. Causal theories considered for empirical adequacy and policy implications. Procedures for processing juvenile offenders by police, courts, and prisons are examined.
  • SOC-S 331 Sociology of Aging (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Survey of the social dimensions of the aging process within a multidisplinary context. Emphasis on the empirical and theoretical findings with regard to the role of the elderly in society, problems of the elderly, and cross-cultural differences in the aging process.
  • SOC-S 335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Relations between racial and ethnic minority and majority groups; psychological, cultural, and sociological theories of prejudice and discrimination; comparative analysis of diverse systems of intergroup relations.
  • SOC-S 338 Gender Roles (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Exploration of the research and theories explaining gender roles in contemporary societies. Emphasis on defining gender roles; tracing their historical development; considering their implications for work, marriage, parenting, and equality in society. Includes cross-cultural comparisons.
  • SOC-S 340 Social Theory (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor.  Junior standing recommended. Sociological theory, with focus on content, form, and historical development. Relationship between theories, data, and sociological explanations.
  • SOC-S 344 Sociology of Childhood (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of the instructor. Analysis of childhood as a structural form and children as social agents who contribute to societal reproduction and change. Considers the relation of childhood to other social institutions and children’s contributions to society historically and cross-culturally. Examines how social policies in education, family, work, and the media affect children’s lives.
  • SOC-S 355 Statistics for Social and Health Professionals (3 cr.) Spring P: 3 hours of sociology and Math 118 or Math 119 or equivilent. This course replaces PSY K 300 and is the required statistics course for all sociology majors. An introduction to statistical analysis including probability, sampling, levels of measurement, descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, and multiple regression as used in sociology and other health related professions.
  • SOC-S 360 Topics in Social Policy: (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor, but some courses have additional prerequisites. Variable topics in social policy. May be repeated for credit 1-4 times with different topics.  Recent topics include:  1. Drugs and Society (P: 3 hours of sociology or consent of instructor) 2. Family Violence (P: 3 hours of sociology or consent of instructor)  3. Health over the life course (P: 3 hours of sociology or consent of instructor) 4. Sustainability and Human Trafficking (P: 3 hours of sociology or consent of instructor) 5. Mental Illness (P: 3 hours of sociology or consent of instructor) 6. Body and Society (P: 3 hours of sociology or consent of instructor) 
  • SOC-S 361 Cities and Suburbs (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Introduction to theory and research on the changing scale and complexity of social organization (urbanization), the quality of life in urban areas, demographic and ecological city growth patterns, and public policy concerns in contemporary urban society.
  • SOC-S 363 Sociology of Development (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. An introduction to the various theoretical perspectives and empirical studies pertaining to development. Specific topics include women in development, sustainable development, and the third world within the context of the global political economy.
  • SOC-S 375 Issues in Human and Social Service Policy (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours in sociology or instructor approval. Examination of theories in sociology relevant to human/social services delivery, as well as the ethical and professional issues of workers in human/social service agencies with clients from diverse populations. Application of sociological concepts, theories, and methods as they apply to the management, practice, and evaluation of human/social service agencies.
  • SOC-S 419 Social Movements and Collective Action (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Change-oriented social and political collective action and consequences for groups and societies. Resource mobilization, historical and comparative analysis of contemporary movements, and collective action.
  • SOC-S 420 Topics in Deviance: Variable Topics (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Variable Topics.
  • SOC-S 431 Topics in Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of sociology or consent of instructor. Various topics in sociological social psychology. May be repeated up to 3x with variable topics. 
  • SOC-S 470 Senior Seminar in Sociology (Traditional Track) (3 cr.) Capstone course in sociology for the B.A. degree. Students conduct individual research projects under faculty supervision, make presentations, discuss sociological issues, prepare for applying to graduate school and for seeking employment with a sociology degree after graduation.  May not be repeated as SOC-S471.
  • SOC-S 471 Senior Seminar in Sociology (Applied Sociology/Human Services Track) (3 cr.) Capstone Course for the Applied Sociology/Human Services Track in the Sociology B.S. Students will investigate issues related to social service agencies, their clients, and/or workers as well as employement strategies after graduation and graduate school options. May not be repeated as SOC-S470.
  • SOC-S 494 Field Experience in Sociology (3 cr.) Fall only. Faculty-directed study of aspects of sociology based on field experience, in conjunction with directed readings and writings. Specifically, each intern is required to participate in 120 hours on site, keep a daily journal that is given at regular intervals to the faculty sponsor, and write an analytic paper dealing with the field experience. May not be repeated as SOC-S 497.
  • SOC-S 495 Individual Readings in Sociology (arr. cr.) P: Junior or Senior Standing and Consent of instructor. Prior arrangement required.
  • SOC-S 497 Field Experience in Human/Social Services (arr. cr.) Fall only. Practical work in a social service agency under direction of a site supervisor and completion 120 hours of supervised internship. Student will job shadow key persons, observe client cases and assist with the usual work of the agency as approved by the site supervisor. Under direction of instructor, student will keep a journal applying sociological concepts and write a directed research paper about an issue related to the experience. May be repeated once for credit in varied setting. May not be repeated as SOC-S 494.
  • SPAN-S 111 Elementary Spanish I (4 cr.) Intensive introduction to present-day Spanish, with drills for mastery or phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.
  • SPAN-S 112 Elementary Spanish II (4 cr.) P: SPAN-S 111 or equivalent. Continuation of SPAN-S 111. Intensive introduction to present-day Spanish, with drills for mastery or phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary.
  • SPAN-S 160 Spanish for Health Care Personnel (3 cr.) This course examines the approach to attending live performances including opera, symphony, theatre, and dance. Topics include protocol and traditions of the audience, criteria for critical listening, and discrimination of basic elements of performance. Students will attend live performances, engage in discussions of performances by genre, and develop critical listening skills.
  • SPAN-S 203 Second-Year Spanish I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 112 or equivalent. Intensive drill reviewing important structural and vocabulary problems, coordinated with literary readings.
  • SPAN-S 204 Second-Year Spanish II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 203 or equivalent. Continuation of SPAN-S 203. Discussions in Spanish of contemporary Spanish literature. Practice in composition both semesters.
  • SPAN-S 275 Hispanic Culture and Conversation (3 cr.) Practice of language skills through reading and discussion of Hispanic culture. Discusses facets of popular culture, diversity of the Spanish speaking world, and themes of social and political importance. Prior knowledge of Spanish not required.
  • SPAN-S 311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. This course is designed to integrate the four basic language skills into a review of the major points of Spanish grammar. Course work will combine grammar exercises with brief controlled compositions based on a reading assignment and class discussion in Spanish. Sentence exercises will be corrected and discussed in class.
  • SPAN-S 312 Written Composition in Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. This course integrates the four basic language skills into a structured approach to composition. Some review of selected points of Spanish grammar will be included. Each student will write a weekly composition, increasing in length as the semester progresses. Emphasis will be on correct usage, vocabulary building, and stylistic control.
  • SPAN-S 317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Practice of conversation in Spanish with emphasis on pronunciation, vocabulary development, and fluency.
  • SPAN-S 325 Spanish for Teachers (3-4 cr.) Focuses on major problem areas of teaching Spanish. Includes review, exercises, and work in pronunciation accompanied by intensive individual practice.
  • SPAN-S 360 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) Study of literature in Spanish.
  • SPCH-C 205 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3 cr.) Basic principles and practice in analysis and reading of selections from prose, poetry, and drama. Public presentation of programs. Lecture and recitation.
  • SPCH-C 255 Social Media Strategies (3 cr.) This course provides students with an introduction to the history, theory, technology, and uses of social media. Students will explore the possibilities and limitations of social media and will have hands-on experience with several forms of social media technology.
  • SPCH-C 315 Internship in Communication (3 cr.) Internship in communication, arranged between the student, the student's faculty mentor, and an internship supervisor.
  • SPCH-C 321 Persuasion (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 or equivalent. Motivational appeals in influencing behavior, psychological factors in speaker-audience relationship, principles and practice of persuasive speaking. Lecture and recitation.
  • SPCH-C 325 Interviewing Principles and Practices (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 or equivalent. Study and practice of methods used in business and industrial interviews, emphasis on the logical and psychological bases for the exchange of information-attitudes. Lecture and recitation.
  • SPCH-C 354 Cyberculture and Community (3 cr.) Advances in communication technology have altered our social landscape. This course explores how emerging technologies form new types of social networks while also changing the rules of communication in existing social units.
  • SPCH-C 380 Organizational Communication (3 cr.) The application of communication theory and research to the study of communication within the formal organization. Communication behavior is examined in a variety of organizational settings: interpersonal, small group, and inter-organizational units.
  • SPCH-C 382 Social Media Campaigns (3 cr.) Working seminar stressing the development and application of social media strategies. Students work with community organizations to design and implement a social media campaign.
  • SPCH-C 391 Topics Course (1-8 cr.) Current topics in use include: Seminar (1–3 cr.) P: consent of instructor. Topic announced in prior semester; oriented to current topics in communication and theatre; readings, projects, and papers as indicated by the topic and instructor. May be repeated up to a total of 8 credit hours.Topics currently in use are: Public Relations Campaigns (1–3 cr.) This course teaches students public relations theories, methods, and practice. Working in teams, students design and place three media messages for community-based public relations clients; Organizational Training and Development (3 cr.) Provides experience in the design, development, presentation, and evaluation of instructional communication training programs.
  • SPCH-C 393 Communication Research Methods (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 This course explores major research methods used by communication scholars, including experimental research, survey research, textual analysis, and ethnography. Students learn how to interpret, evaluate and propose research.
  • SPCH-C 394 Research Seminar (3 cr.) Practice conducting research in the discipline of communication. Examination of the theoretical foundations of various forms of communication research.
  • SPCH-C 437 Creative Dramatics (3 cr.) Laboratory course in informal dramatics that emphasizes the child rather than the production; includes methods of stimulating the child to imaginative creation of drama with the materials of poetry, stories, choral readings, and music.
  • SPCH-C 444 Political Communication (3 cr.) Examination of communication in political campaigns and social movements. Campaign topics include speech-making, advertising, news coverage, and debates. Case studies in social movements, including anti-war, civil rights, feminism, and others.
  • SPCH-C 480 Communication Theory (3 cr.) A critical evaluation of theories in the field of human communication. Consideration is given to theories which explain communication behavior between pairs of people, within groups, in organizations, and in societies.
  • SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking (3 cr.) Theory and practice of public speaking; training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content, personality, components of effective delivery, and language.
  • SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) Practical consideration of spontaneous human interaction in face-to-face situations. Special attention to perception, language, and attitudes, in dyads and small groups.
  • SPCH-S 201 Communicating in Public (3 cr.) R: SPCH-S 121. Theory and advanced practice of public speaking. Designed primarily for, but not limited to, majors in communication-related fields.
  • SPCH-S 205 Introduction to Speech Communication (3 cr.) Overview of the theories and principles of effective communication in interpersonal, group, organizational, and public settings.
  • SPCH-S 223 Business and Professional Speaking (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121. Preparation and presentation of types of speeches and oral reports appropriate to business and professional occupations; group discussion and parliamentary procedures.
  • SPCH-S 228 Argumentation and Debate (3 cr.) Reasoning, evidence and argument in public discourse. Study of forms of argument. Practice in argumentative speaking.
  • SPCH-S 229 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.) Leadership and participation in group, committee, conference, and public discussion; logical and psychological aspects of group process.
  • SPCH-S 233 Introduction to Public Relations (3 cr.) A survey of the historical antecedents and contemporary practice of public relations in the U.S. Emphasis is on the nature of day-to-day tasks and the communication responsibility of public relations practitioners in a variety of professional settings.
  • SPCH-S 302 Rhetoric and Society (3 cr.) Examination of sources and functions of symbolic influence in contemporary society. Emphasis will be placed on the development of skills necessary for understanding and analyzing instances of rhetoric occurring in a variety of social contexts.
  • SPCH-S 322 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 122. Advanced consideration of communication in human relationships. Emphasis given to self-concept; perception; language; nonverbal interaction; listening; interpersonal conflict; and communication skills in family, social, and work situations.
  • SPCH-S 333 Public Relations (3 cr.) Principles of contemporary public relations, including ethics of public relations; impact on society; and uses by government, business, and social institutions for international and external communication. Public relations as a problem solving process utilizing theoretical and application strategies.
  • SPCH-S 336 Current Topics in Communication (3 cr.) Extensive analysis of selected problems in contemporary speech communication. Topics vary each semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once for credit.
  • SPCH-S 398 Independent Study in Speech Communication (1-6 cr.) P: junior standing and approval of instructor. Independent study or practicum experience. Projects must be approved by faculty member before enrolling. May be repeated up to a total of 6 credit hours.
  • SPCH-S 400 Senior Seminar in Speech (3 cr.) Study of problems and issues in rhetoric and communication. Topic varies.  
  • SPCH-S 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.) A survey study of national, cultural, and cross-cultural persuasion in theory and practice.
  • SSCI-S 100 Strategies for Success in College Mathematics (3 cr.) Students will develop strategies for learning and retaining college level mathematical concepts and procedures.  Techniques for overcoming math anxiety and test anxiety will also be learned.  Appropriate mathematical content will be taught to provide the students the opportunity to practice their new learning strategies and test-taking techniques.  Upon completion of this course students will be well equipped for success in their first college credit mathematics course.
  • SSCI-S 100 Strategies for Success in College Mathematics (3 cr.) Fall, Spring. Students will develop strategies for learning and retaining college level mathematical concepts and procedures.  Techniques for overcoming math anxiety and test anxiety will also be learned.  Appropriate mathematical content will be taught to provide the students the opportunity to practice their new learning strategies and test-taking techniques.  Upon completion of this course students will be equipped for success in their first college credit mathematics course.
  • SSCI-S 105 Freshman Seminar in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (1 cr.) Fall. Small-class experience with faculty instructor.  Introduction to college-level projects in thinking, research, and writing in a small-group context.  Topics will vary.  Open only to freshmen.
  • SSCI-S 430 Professional Practice for General Studies (1 - 6 cr.) This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to receive credit for career-related, full-time work.  Evaluation by employer and instructor or school dean.  The course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • STAT 30100 Elementary Statistical Methods I (3 cr.) Fall, Spring.  A basic introductory statistics course with applications shown to various fields and emphasis placed on assumptions, applicability, and interpretations of various statistical techniques. Subject matter includes frequency distribution, descriptive statistics, elementary probability, normal distribution, applications, sampling distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing, and linear regression.
  • SUST-S 400 Energy Sources and Needs (3 cr.) Renewable and non-renewable energy resources, their origins, society's needs and usage, environmental impacts of use and production, and future directions in energy technologies.  Also may include study of non-energy resources including metallic and nonmetallic resources.
  • SUST-S 491 Internship in Sustainability (3 cr.) Involves placement in a business, not-for-profit agency or governmental unit to give student hands on experience working with sustainability in a practical setting.
  • TEL-R 309 Television Production (3 cr.) Introduction to the production process in the studio and in the field.
  • TEL-R 407 Field Television Production (3 cr.) P: TEL-R 309 and consent of instructor. Planning, writing, producing, and editing program inserts and segments for television using portable video equipment.
  • TEL-R 424 Advanced Production Workshop (3 cr.) P: TEL-R 407 or TEL-R 409 or consent of instructor. Advanced production techniques in a specialized area. The topics will cover advanced theory and concepts that build upon lower-level video production courses. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • TEL-T 283 Introduction to Production Techniques and Practices (3 cr.) Introduction to audio, field, and studio production bridges the theoretical and practical aspects of production through written hands-on exercises.
  • TEL-T 337 Video Field Production (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 283 or TEL-R 309. Advanced course in video production. Students will apply their knowledge of visual aesthetics, production, and communication to produce a corporate video campaign.
  • THTR-C 130 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.) An introduction to the study of theatre; the wide range of critical, historical, aesthetic, and practical interests necessary to a well-rounded view; emphasis on theatre as an art form; elements of dramatic construction.
  • THTR-T 120 Acting I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology and skills; body movement, voice and diction, observations, concentration, imagination. Emphasis on improvisation exercises.
  • THTR-T 149 Introductory Speech and Theatre Practicum (1-2 cr.) Introductory directed projects in speech and theatre.
  • THTR-T 220 Acting II (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 120 or consent of instructor. Textual analysis and techniques of communicating with body and voice. Study and performance of characters in scenes from Shakespeare and modern realistic and nonrealistic dramas.
  • THTR-T 226 Readers Theatre I (3 cr.) Exploration of theory and techniques, Practical experience materials; fiction and nonfiction, poetry, prose, dramatic dialogue.
  • THTR-T 236 Readers Theatre I (3 cr.) Exploration of theory and techniques. Practical experience with a variety of materials: fiction and nonfiction, poetry, prose, dramatic dialogue.
  • THTR-T 245 Living Theatre (1-2 cr.) Attendance at eight selected productions in the community during the semester, lecture and discussion of each production, short written analyses, and term paper. No withdrawal permitted after second week of class. For 1 credit hour: attend lectures and productions. For 2 credit hours: complete course as described. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.
  • THTR-T 345 Theatre for Children (3 cr.) Purposes, principles, and problems of staging plays for children.
  • THTR-T 483 Topics in Theatre and Drama (1 cr.) This is a Capstone course for students in the Creative Arts-Theatre Concentration.  For 1 credit hour, students will be involved in the production of a play or musical from planning stages to completion. 
  • WOST-W 350 Women: Images and Perspectives (3 cr.) Fall or spring. This interdisciplinary course studies how women’s lives in America are shaped by social values; by cultural beliefs, traditions, and ideology; and by social, political, and economic institutions or policies. It also considers how these are reflected in imaginative literature as well as social reality.
  • ZOOL-Z 315 Developmental Anatomy (5 cr.) Alternate years.  Comparative study of the structure and development of vertebrates, including humans.* 
Last updated: 09/13/2016